[{"id":"10690","title":"Johnny English Reborn","content":"Johnny English Reborn is a British action comedy film parodying the James Bond secret agent genre. It stars Rowan Atkinson with Gillian Anderson, Rik Mayall, Dominic West, Rosamund Pike and Daniel Kaluuya in supporting roles. The film is directed by Oliver Parker based on a script by Hamish McColl and William Davies. It is the sequel to the 2003 film Johnny English.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nUniversal Pictures first announced that they were producing a sequel to Johnny English on April 8, 2010 seven years after the first film.\r\n\r\nFilming began on September 11, 2010 in Central London at Cannon Street, with further production scheduled for the week beginning September 13, 2010 at Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire and later in Hawley Woods in Hampshire, Macau and Hong Kong. Filming took place on The Mall in Central London on 25 September, 2010.\r\n\r\nRowan Atkinson returns to the role of the accidental secret agent who doesn\u2019t know fear or danger in the comedy spy-thriller Johnny English Reborn.\u00a0 In his latest adventure, the most unlikely intelligence officer in Her Majesty\u2019s Secret Service must stop a group of international assassins before they eliminate a world leader and cause global chaos.\r\n\r\nIn the years since MI-7\u2019s top spy vanished off the grid, he has been honing his unique skills in a remote region of Asia.\u00a0 But when his agency superiors learn of an attempt against the Chinese premier\u2019s life, they must hunt down the highly unorthodox agent.\u00a0 Now that the world needs him once again, Johnny English is back in action.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Rowan Atkinson returns to the role of the accidental secret agent who doesn\u2019t know fear or danger in the comedy spy-thriller Johnny English Reborn. In his latest adventure, the most unlikely intelligence officer in Her Majesty\u2019s Secret Service must stop a group of international assassins before they eliminate a world leader and cause global chaos.","post_date":"18th April 2019, 11:48:49","french_date":"18 avril 2019, 11:48:49","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 15:48:49","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10689","title":"Snow White and the Huntsman","content":"Snow White & the Huntsman is a fantasy adventure film directed by Rupert Sanders and written by Evan Daugherty. The film is slated for release on June 1, 2012 in the United States.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nIn a kingdom ruled by tyranny, the queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron) learns that her stepdaughter, Snow White (Kristen Stewart), will surpass her as ruler of her kingdom and become the Fairest in the land. However, she is told by the Magic Mirror (Christopher Obi) that if she, Ravenna, consumes Snow White's heart then she will live forever, but Snow White is able to escape into the Dark Forest. To capture her the Queen recruits a Huntsman, Eric (Chris Hemsworth), to retrieve Snow White. However, the Huntsman takes pity on the girl and instead of killing her brings her under his wing and with his help Snow White begins to learn the art of war. She starts a rebellion to bring down Ravenna with the aid of seven dwarves and Prince William (Sam Claflin), who has been in love with Snow White for many years.\r\n\r\nFilm producers considered casting a less well-known actress for the role of Snow White, with mention of Riley Keough, Felicity Jones, Bella Heathcote and Alicia Vikander as possible picks. This idea became less likely as actresses Kristen Stewart and Dakota Fanning were later rumored to be shortlisted for the role.\r\n\r\nOn March 4, 2011, the casting rumors were fueled even more by a series of tweets from co-producer Palak Patel that confirmed that Kristen Stewart was offered the role of Snow White. The tweets also stated that an official confirmation would be coming out later that week, but it would be several weeks before her casting was officially confirmed by the studio.\r\n\r\nAt first, Winona Ryder was considered to play Ravenna, before the role went to Charlize Theron. Johnny Depp turned down the offer to play Eric, the huntsman. Viggo Mortensen was in negotiations with Universal for the part, but ultimately turned down the role as well. Hugh Jackman was briefly offered to play the role of the huntsman but also declined. In 2011, Thor star Chris Hemsworth was eventually cast in the role of the huntsman.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"In a twist to the fairy tale, the Huntsman ordered to take Snow White into the woods to be killed winds up becoming her protector and mentor in a quest to vanquish the Evil Queen. Snow White & the Huntsman is directed by Rupert Sanders and written by Evan Daugherty.","post_date":"18th April 2019, 11:41:15","french_date":"18 avril 2019, 11:41:15","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 15:41:15","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10688","title":"Machine Gun Preacher","content":"Machine Gun Preacher tells the inspirational true story of Sam Childers, a former drug-dealing criminal who undergoes an astonishing transformation and finds his unexpected calling as the savior of hundreds of kidnapped and orphaned children in war-torn Sudan. \r\n\r\nThe movie was written by Jason Keller and produces by veteran producer Robbie Brenner.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nKeller spent most of a year and half learning about Sam Childers before he began to write in earnest. In the meantime, Brenner needed to raise the money to get the project off the ground.\r\n\r\n\u201cI knew I didn\u2019t want to make this movie inside the studio system,\u201d she says. \u201cIt is so topical and so urgent. With a studio, you can never guarantee that a movie will be made in a timely fashion\u2014or ever. We needed to find somebody to finance the script who was equally passionate about it.\u201d\r\n\r\nGerard Butler (300) delivers a searing performance as Childers, the impassioned founder of the Angels of East Africa rescue organization in Golden Globe\u00ae-nominated director Marc Forster\u2019s (Monster\u2019s Ball, The Kite Runner) moving story of violence and redemption.\r\n\r\nFrom small-town Pennsylvania to the sun-baked scrub forests of Sudan, Machine Gun Preacher follows Sam Childers\u2019 journey between two very disparate landscapes.\r\n\r\nFor the filmmakers, it sometimes felt like they were shooting two separate movies: one in Detroit, which doubled for Childers\u2019 hometown, Central City Pennsylvania; another in South Africa, which stood in for Sudan.\r\n\r\n\u201cSam\u2019s life is divided,\u201d says Forster. \u201cHis family is in Pennsylvania and the orphanage is in Africa. In the movie, he essentially abandons his real family for a new family in Sudan. He has a purpose there that he never had in the U.S. I feel these two worlds represent his inner and outer lives and to juxtapose them against each other in the film is really interesting.\u201d","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Machine Gun Preacher tells the inspirational true story of Sam Childers, a former drug-dealing criminal who undergoes an astonishing transformation and finds his unexpected calling as the savior of hundreds of kidnapped and orphaned children in war-torn Sudan. ","post_date":"18th April 2019, 11:39:05","french_date":"18 avril 2019, 11:39:05","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 15:39:05","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10687","title":"The Housemaid","content":"The Housemaid is a 2010 South Korean erotic thriller film directed by Im Sang-soo. The story focuses on Eun-yi, played by Jeon Do-yeon, who becomes involved in a destructive love triangle while working as a housemaid for an upper-class family. Other cast members include Lee Jung-jae, Seo Woo and Yoon Yeo-jeong. The film is a remake of Kim Ki-young's 1960 film The Housemaid. It competed for the Palme d'Or at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nEun-yi is an innocent young woman who is hired as an upper class family housemaid, and is tasked to take care of the family's small daughter and her pregnant mother, Hae-ra. Byung-sik is an older housemaid who has been with this family for a long time and holds many secrets. But soon enough, the master of the house, Hoon, takes advantage of his social position by slipping into the new housemaid's bed.\r\n\r\nHoon's visits become frequent and Byung-sik reports the affair to Hae-ra's mother Mi-hee, who plots to give Hae-ra the control over her husband. Soon Eun-yi becomes pregnant by Hoon and wants to keep the baby. This is discovered by the family and Eun-yi is forced by Mi-hee to have an abortion despite the young woman's pleas to let her keep the baby and leave the house. Her forced abortion turns Eun-yi's already fragile mental condition for the worse and she decides to take the matter into her own hands...\r\n\r\nA first screenplay for the film was written by Kim Soo-hyun, but after director Im Sang-soo had edited the script so heavily that Kim considered it to be entirely Im's own work, she decided to leave the project and publicly expressed her dissatisfaction.Although the film includes some key elements of the original, Kim Ki-young's The Housemaid from 1960, Im has said that he tried to never think of it during the production in order to come up with a modern and original work. One major difference between the versions is that the original film took place in the middle class, while the remake is set in an extreme upper-class environment.\r\n\r\nIm explains this with South Korea's social structure around 1960, which was a time when the country's middle class started to form and many poor people moved from the countryside to work in the cities: \"women became housemaids who served not only for the rich but also the middle class and that issue had served as the basis to Kim Ki-young's work. What I realized upon reworking The Housemaid in 50 years was that there are much more wealthy people now, people who are millionaires. ... I wanted to depict the reality in which housewives from normal families have to undertake hard work too\". The film was produced by the Seoul-based company Mirovision.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"The Housemaid is a 2010 South Korean erotic thriller film directed by Im Sang-soo. The story focuses on Eun-yi, played by Jeon Do-yeon, who becomes involved in a destructive love triangle while working as a housemaid for an upper-class family. ","post_date":"18th April 2019, 11:20:37","french_date":"18 avril 2019, 11:20:37","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 15:20:37","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10686","title":"Goon","content":"Hockey - it's a Canadian as donuts which is why producer David Gross couldn't help but feel frustration that the quintessential movie about the sport, Slapshot, was made by someone other than a Canadian. And damn it, David Gross was going to do something about it.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nTogether with producer Jesse Shapira, Gross found screenwriter Evan Goldberg (Pineapple Express, Superbad, The Simpsons) and asked him if he'd like to write a Canadian hockey movie. Turns out that being an expat Canadian, Goldberg had been chomping at the bit to do something about the old country. He liked the idea. He was excited about the idea. He wanted to write the screenplay. There was just one problem - he knew nothing about hockey (a fact that could lose him his citizenship, but we won't go there right now). So he turned to actor\/writer Jay Baruchel.\r\n\r\nNow Baruchel is a different story. He'd been weaned on hockey and his time spent in the California sun hadn't leached that out of his sub-zero Montreal-winter blood. \"All of my knowledge or interest in hockey comes from my father,\" he said. \"I was raised in a household where the Montreal Canadians were effectively our religion: Jewish on Dad\u2019s side, Catholic on Mum\u2019s, all Habs fans. And Dad\u2019s favorite players were always the tough ones, the enforcers - or the goons for lack of a better term: Chris \"Knuckles\" Nilan, John \"Rambo\" Kordic, Larry \"Big Bird\" Robinson, friggin\u2019 Lyle Odelein.\"\r\n\r\nBaruchel met with Goldberg, Gross and Shapira and everything fell into place. \"It was almost five years ago when we finished the first draft,\" he said. Writing the script was a bi-coastal process - Goldberg in LA, Baruchel in Montreal. They tweaked it back and forth via email. \"Then we brought some other really talented writers into the writers' room: Kyle Hunter, Ariel Shaffir and my writing partner, Jesse Chabot.\" This was teamwork, through and through.\r\n\r\nGOON is inspired by the book, Goon: The True Story of an Unlikely Journey\u00a0and starring\u00a0Seann William Scottand\u00a0Liev Schreiber.\r\n\r\nInto a Minor Hockey League, about Doug Smith, a late bloomer, who didn't start playing hockey until age 19 and came equipped with the unlikely skill of an amateur boxer. No one in the Goon camp remembers who found the book first. Best guess is it was Jesse Shapira.\r\n\r\nMike \"The Captain\" Dowse is a director with hockey in his DNA. \"I was a Flames fan first because I'm originally from Calgary. When I moved to Montreal, it took me four years to switch over to being a Habs fan, but having a kid helped me get into it. I also started playing hockey again for the first time since I was fourteen. When you get right down to it, I love hockey.\"","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Hockey - it's a Canadian as donuts which is why producer David Gross couldn't help but feel frustration that the quintessential movie about the sport, Slapshot, was made by someone other than a Canadian. And damn it, David Gross was going to do something about it.","post_date":"18th April 2019, 11:16:13","french_date":"18 avril 2019, 11:16:13","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 15:16:13","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10685","title":"A Thousand Words","content":"A Thousand Words is a comedy-drama film starring Eddie Murphy and directed by Norbit and Meet Dave director Brian Robbins. The cast also includes Ariel Winter, Allison Janney, Kerry Washington, Cliff Curtis, Jack McBrayer, Clark Duke, John Witherspoon, Jordan-Claire Green, Darcy Rose Byrnes, Justina Machado, Madison Leisle, Steve Little, Terence Bernie Hines and Edi Patterson.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThousand Words was originally filmed in 2008, to be released in 2009, but was repeatedly delayed after being caught up in the separation of DreamWorks Pictures from Paramount Pictures and Viacom. During an interview for Fred: The Movie, director Brian Robbins stated that the film would be released in 2011. Reshoots were done on the film early in 2011.\r\n\r\nEddie Murphy is Jack McCall, a fast-talking literary agent, who can close any deal, any time, any way. He has set his sights on New Age guru Dr. Sinja (Cliff Curtis) for his own selfish purposes. But Dr. Sinja is on to him, and Jack's life comes unglued after a magical Bodhi tree mysteriously appears in his backyard. With every word Jack speaks, a leaf falls from the tree and he realizes that when the last leaf falls, both he and the tree are toast. Words have never failed Jack McCall, but now he's got to stop talking and conjure up some outrageous ways to communicate or he's a goner.\r\n\r\nThe film was then given a January 2012 release, but after Murphy was announced as Oscar host (he has since stepped down), the film was given an official release of March 23, 2012.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"A Thousand Words is a comedy-drama film starring Eddie Murphy and directed by Norbit and Meet Dave director Brian Robbins. The cast also includes Ariel Winter, Allison Janney, Kerry Washington, Cliff Curtis, Jack McBrayer, Clark Duke, John Witherspoon, Jordan-Claire Green, Darcy Rose Byrnes, Justina Machado, Madison Leisle","post_date":"18th April 2019, 11:09:45","french_date":"18 avril 2019, 11:09:45","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 15:09:45","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10684","title":"Bolden","content":"Charles \u201cBuddy\u201d Bolden grew up in New Orleans at the end of 19th century to forge a new kind of music. Fusing blues, ragtime, and gospel with an improvisational urgency anchored by his cornet\u2019s sensual sound, Bolden \u201cinvented\u201d jazz, one of America\u2019s few indigenous art forms and its earliest and most important cultural export.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nInspired by the life of Buddy Bolden and told in a dynamically immersive style, the inventive, atmospheric film, from a script by Pritzker and David Rothschild, imagines Bolden\u2019s eventful, tragic life, the social context in which his revolutionary music was conceived, and the resounding influence he had on artists like Louis Armstrong and on the musical form itself.\r\n\r\nBOLDEN has been a passion project for director and writer Dan Pritzker for decades. A guitarist for the Chicago-based rock\/soul\/R&B band Sonia Dada, Pritzker became aware of Bolden\u2019s life story when he was recommended a nonfiction book with a tantalizing description. \u201cI was touring with Sonia Dada, and a friend of mine said he was reading about \u2018this guy who invented jazz\u2019 \u2014 that got my attention!\u201d Pritzker recalls. \u201cIt sounds like a ridiculous concept, like saying someone invented lightning. But Bolden was the shaman who flipped the lights on. Musically, he laid the foundation for what jazz came to be, and for pop culture in America.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u201cDon\u2019s book was an invaluable place to start,\u201d says Pritzker. \u201cIt was basic history, and there were also passages in it that theorized about moments in Bolden\u2019s life. For instance, Marquis conjectured that Bolden went to a certain school because of the way he wrote the letter B, based on the only signature of his we have, on clarinet player Frank White\u2019s marriage certificate.\u201d\r\n\r\nAfter Pritzker contacted Marquis, the author took Pritzker on a tour of locations crucial to Bolden\u2019s New Orleans, including his home and the sites where he played. Then the filmmaker turned to historian Bruce Raeburn, curator of the Hogan Jazz Archives at Tulane University and Assistant Dean of Libraries for Special Collections, who provided vital biographical information about Bolden as well as sociopolitical and historical context and how it related to Bolden\u2019s music. \u201cBeing a musician himself, Dan appreciates American music and how significant it became over the course of the 20th century,\u201d says Raeburn. \u201cHe delved into the historical and cultural context of early twentieth century New Orleans, a complicated place where racism and segregation influenced the way people behaved. In neighborhoods like the Treme and Central City sections, where Bolden grew up, there was a new culture just beginning to realize itself. But it begins with a black vernacular sensibility. It\u2019s the emergence of black voices in the American experience. He brought a passion for Bolden, and that was fundamental to what he wanted to bring to the film.\u201d\r\n\r\nHowever, the more Pritzker researched, the more he realized how scant the historical record of Bolden\u2019s actual life was, including, shockingly, his music, which was never officially recorded. \u201cBolden represents what makes American popular music internationally successful,\u201d says Raeburn \u2014\u00a0yet no recording of him exists, and Bolden never wrote down his arrangements.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Pritzker was initially drawn to British actor Gary Carr because of the actor\u2019s theater experience, sensing that the rigorous training of the stage would allow him to delve into the talent and madness of Bolden in a singularly expressive way. It also helped that Carr \u2014 known in the US for HBO\u2019s The Deuce and a product of \u00a0British Theatre and TV including Downton Abbey and Death in Paradise \u2014 is a trained musician and played a jazz singer on Downton Abbey.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Carr discovered freedom in imagination. \u201cThere was hardly any information about Bolden,\u201d says Carr. \u201cThere was no music for me to reference, not much written or photographic documentation. I had this script and the book In Search of Buddy Bolden, which illustrated what Bolden\u2019s life could have been. However, there was much room for interpretation. It gave me a lot to play with. So, I had the world that he lived in New Orleans, information about the politics of the time and the Jim Crow south, and the way insanity was treated. It was a fascinating opportunity, and a magical kind of challenge.\u201d\r\n\r\nWhile Carr has a background in music, jazz was a different animal, especially Bolden\u2019s groundbreaking style. Another issue: Carr\u2019s instrument of choice was the piano, not a horn.\r\n\r\nWith music naturally being a crucial part of BOLDEN, the filmmakers knew there needed to be magic on the soundtrack. Enter Wynton Marsalis.\u00a0 \u201cWe knew we needed someone with the musical prowess and deep passion for New Orleans music, so Wynton Marsalis would be our first (and only), choice to join the project,\u201d says producer Jon Cornick. \u00a0\u201cI had friends in common with Wynton\u2019s manager, Ed Arrendell, and so I contacted him. \u00a0Although Ed was a bit skeptical, he was certainly intrigued and at the end of our conversation, Ed said he would get back to me in a few days. \u00a0Ninety minutes later, he called me and said Wynton would like to have dinner with Dan and I in New York in the coming week! \u00a0It was a great moment when I called Dan to let him know.\"\r\n\r\nAs Nora \u2014\u00a0Buddy Bolden\u2019s wife, who, despite her deep love for Buddy, has to contend with his drinking, womanizing and descent into madness \u2014 Yaya DaCosta (The Nice Guys, And So It Goes, TV\u2019s Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Ugly Betty) connected with the inner fire that Nora found during the difficult times. \"Everyone wants something from Buddy. Nora wants to be in a relationship with the man she loves,\" she says. The role provided a chance to reflect on the era BOLDEN took place in, and the challenges that African-Americans faced in New Orleans across the nation, then and now. \u201cBeing on set in New Orleans, in costume, with all those actors reminded me in a visceral way of what some of my ancestors might have felt,\u201d says DaCosta. \u201cIt was beautiful and scary and powerful. \u00a0It was such a privilege to be in a film like this.\u201d\r\n\r\nSurrounding the actors in sets and costumes that fit the era and the atmosphere was tasked to a production team who knew the perfect notes to hit. Costume designer Colleen Morris, who\u2019s worked on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and The Deuce, created a meticulous wardrobe. Morris was uniquely prepared for the job, with expert knowledge of period fabrics and jazz and Buddy Bolden himself. \u201cMy dad was a huge Louis Armstrong fan, so of course I knew the name Buddy Bolden, but we never could find anything out about him. When I realized what this film was, it was inspiring. It felt like my participation was meant to be,\u201d Morris explains.\r\n\r\nPritzker employed actual dance choreography to inform another character in the movie: Buddy Bolden as a child, who is seen through the adult Buddy\u2019s addled memory and insanity. To underscore the poetic hallucinatory nature of his childhood recollections, Pritzker staged a gorgeous and surreal series of intercuts, transporting us back to his boyhood with his mother, a seamstress. For those scenes, Pritzker enlisted Tony-winning actor choreographer Hinton Battle (Miss Saigon, Sophisticated Ladies) to design an ethereal dance scene.\r\n\r\nJazz legend Wynton Marsalis, an Executive Producer of BOLDEN and the guiding force behind the music in the film, says that he\u2019s hopeful the film will shed light on Buddy Bolden \u201cSo that people can understand another aspect of our history and our culture.\u201d","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Charles \u201cBuddy\u201d Bolden grew up in New Orleans at the end of 19th century to forge a new kind of music. Fusing blues, ragtime, and gospel with an improvisational urgency anchored by his cornet\u2019s sensual sound, Bolden \u201cinvented\u201d jazz, one of America\u2019s few indigenous art forms and its earliest and most important cultural export.","post_date":"17th April 2019, 21:02:01","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 21:02:01","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 01:02:01","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10683","title":"More Movie Details","content":"[vc_row][vc_column][vc_text_separator title=\"UPCOMING MOVIES\" i_icon_fontawesome=\"fa fa-film\" color=\"blue\" add_icon=\"true\"][\/vc_column][\/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][rev_slider_vc alias=\"upcoming\"][vc_text_separator title=\"IN THEATRES NOW\" i_icon_fontawesome=\"fa fa-slideshare\" i_background_style=\"rounded-less-outline\" i_size=\"lg\" color=\"orange\" add_icon=\"true\"][vc_basic_grid post_type=\"post\" max_items=\"12\" style=\"lazy\" items_per_page=\"15\" item=\"basicGrid_VerticalFlip\" grid_id=\"vc_gid:1555548605539-067af5d746decfd870f18ae744ff352a-10\" taxonomies=\"3, 148, 63, 584, 84, 1943, 126, 168, 678\" exclude=\"10646, 10659, 10653, 10677\" offset=\"0\"][\/vc_column][\/vc_row]","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"17th April 2019, 20:50:51","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 20:50:51","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 00:50:51","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10682","title":"Last Knights","content":"Set in a nameless feudal society, LAST KNIGHTS tells the timeless tale of a fallen warrior and his enduring loyalty to the master who redeemed him from the despair of his dark past. The film follows Commander Raiden (Clive Owen) and his band of warriors as they wage battle against the corrupt ruler Geza Mott to avenge the unjust death of their honorable leader Lord Bartok (Morgan Freeman).\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWith its universal themes, LAST KNIGHTS indeed hearkens back to the Japanese legend of 47 Ronin and classic films such as Seven Samurai and its American remake The Magnificent Seven, however, it does not fall squarely into the genre of samurai film.\r\n\r\nWhen director Kazuaki Kiriya first approached Lucy Y. Kim to produce LAST KNIGHTS, he already had Oscar\u00ae nominee Clive Owen attached to the project and Michael Konyves' finished script in hand. Once aboard, Kim and Kiriya embarked on another three years of development during which they began to seek out financing and conceptualize the overall look of the film.\r\n\r\nFrom the onset, Kiriya was intent upon casting globally with no regard to nationality, language or skin color.\u00a0 Owen recalls: \"the first time he ever spoke about it, he said 'I just want to cast the best actors and I don't care where they're from. It's not going to be set in Asia or in the West or anywhere\" Kiriya says that Owen exceeded his already high expectations with his turn as Raiden. \"He just gave the character so much more depth.\" Freeman very much enjoyed playing a lord for the first time in his lengthy career. \"He's a man of some great honor but he's from a feudal system. He looks upon himself as a protector of the people who live on his lands and work his lands,\" he says of Bartok.\r\n\r\nRaiden's nemesis Geza Mott is played by Norwegian actor\/director Aksel Hennie. A fan of Kiriya's earlier work, Hennie was immediately intrigued by the opportunity to play this power-mad psychopat.\u00a0Popular Korean actress Park Si-Yeon steps into the role of Hannah, Geza Mott's abused and neglected trophy wife, and Hannah's stoic father, Auguste, is played by Korea's premiere actor Ahn Sung-Ki.\r\n\r\nSimilarly, when award-winning Iranian actor Payman Maadi suddenly became available for the role of the Emperor, Kiriya was beyond thrilled. \"I just could not believe that I could get Payman for this role. I saw A Separation and I was like 'wooooow,\"\r\n\r\n LAST KNIGHTS was originally to be shot on location in India but when scheduling issues rendered filming there logistically impossible, the filmmakers had to nimbly devise a new plan. Production designer Ricky Eyres, who had filmed in Prague several times previously, convinced the filmmakers that the Czech Republic could easily meet their narrative needs if the script were altered slightly to reflect a more European climate and aesthetic.\r\n\r\nAfter the filmmakers' challengingly brief seven-week prep period in Prague, ten weeks of principal photography kicked off in November of 2012. The majority of the shoot took place on dozens of locations throughout the Czech Republic and included a several-day-shoot at Barrandov Studios in Prague.\r\n\r\nThe team extensively scouted some of the most stunning locales the country has to offer, including medieval castles, chateaux and monasteries such as Dobris, Hluboka and Kladruby, then assembled their visually intriguing tapestry from them. The villainous Geza Mott's compound, for example, comprises diverse elements from five separate locations including Krivoklat Castle, Dobris Chateau, Horin Castle, Chotesov Monastery and the National Museum in Prague.\r\n\r\nKiriya and the producers brought aboard YOUNG CHOI of Korea's Mofac Studios to produce the visual effects on LAST KNIGHTS and help the director achieve this unorthodox vision. DOOHONG JUNG serves as the film\u2019s stunt coordinator and action unit director. Kiriya remembers first being impressed by the raw, kinetic energy of Jung's work in Chan-Woo Park's revenge classic Old Boy.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Set in a nameless feudal society, Clive Owen and Morgan Freeman star in the action-drama Last Knights, a timeless tale of a fallen warrior and his enduring loyalty to the master who redeemed him from the despair of his dark past.","post_date":"17th April 2019, 20:42:08","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 20:42:08","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-18 00:42:08","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10681","title":"Bolden","content":"Charles \u201cBuddy\u201d Bolden grew up in New Orleans at the end of 19th century to forge a new kind of music. Fusing blues, ragtime, and gospel with an improvisational urgency anchored by his cornet\u2019s sensual sound, Bolden \u201cinvented\u201d jazz, one of America\u2019s few indigenous art forms and its earliest and most important cultural export.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nInspired by the life of Buddy Bolden and told in a dynamically immersive style, the inventive, atmospheric film, from a script by Pritzker and David Rothschild, imagines Bolden\u2019s eventful, tragic life, the social context in which his revolutionary music was conceived, and the resounding influence he had on artists like Louis Armstrong and on the musical form itself.\r\n\r\nBOLDEN has been a passion project for director and writer Dan Pritzker for decades. A guitarist for the Chicago-based rock\/soul\/R&B band Sonia Dada, Pritzker became aware of Bolden\u2019s life story when he was recommended a nonfiction book with a tantalizing description. \u201cI was touring with Sonia Dada, and a friend of mine said he was reading about \u2018this guy who invented jazz\u2019 \u2014 that got my attention!\u201d Pritzker recalls. \u201cIt sounds like a ridiculous concept, like saying someone invented lightning. But Bolden was the shaman who flipped the lights on. Musically, he laid the foundation for what jazz came to be, and for pop culture in America.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u201cDon\u2019s book was an invaluable place to start,\u201d says Pritzker. \u201cIt was basic history, and there were also passages in it that theorized about moments in Bolden\u2019s life. For instance, Marquis conjectured that Bolden went to a certain school because of the way he wrote the letter B, based on the only signature of his we have, on clarinet player Frank White\u2019s marriage certificate.\u201d\r\n\r\nAfter Pritzker contacted Marquis, the author took Pritzker on a tour of locations crucial to Bolden\u2019s New Orleans, including his home and the sites where he played. Then the filmmaker turned to historian Bruce Raeburn, curator of the Hogan Jazz Archives at Tulane University and Assistant Dean of Libraries for Special Collections, who provided vital biographical information about Bolden as well as sociopolitical and historical context and how it related to Bolden\u2019s music. \u201cBeing a musician himself, Dan appreciates American music and how significant it became over the course of the 20th century,\u201d says Raeburn. \u201cHe delved into the historical and cultural context of early twentieth century New Orleans, a complicated place where racism and segregation influenced the way people behaved. In neighborhoods like the Treme and Central City sections, where Bolden grew up, there was a new culture just beginning to realize itself. But it begins with a black vernacular sensibility. It\u2019s the emergence of black voices in the American experience. He brought a passion for Bolden, and that was fundamental to what he wanted to bring to the film.\u201d\r\n\r\nHowever, the more Pritzker researched, the more he realized how scant the historical record of Bolden\u2019s actual life was, including, shockingly, his music, which was never officially recorded. \u201cBolden represents what makes American popular music internationally successful,\u201d says Raeburn \u2014\u00a0yet no recording of him exists, and Bolden never wrote down his arrangements.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Pritzker was initially drawn to British actor Gary Carr because of the actor\u2019s theater experience, sensing that the rigorous training of the stage would allow him to delve into the talent and madness of Bolden in a singularly expressive way. It also helped that Carr \u2014 known in the US for HBO\u2019s The Deuce and a product of \u00a0British Theatre and TV including Downton Abbey and Death in Paradise \u2014 is a trained musician and played a jazz singer on Downton Abbey.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Carr discovered freedom in imagination. \u201cThere was hardly any information about Bolden,\u201d says Carr. \u201cThere was no music for me to reference, not much written or photographic documentation. I had this script and the book In Search of Buddy Bolden, which illustrated what Bolden\u2019s life could have been. However, there was much room for interpretation. It gave me a lot to play with. So, I had the world that he lived in New Orleans, information about the politics of the time and the Jim Crow south, and the way insanity was treated. It was a fascinating opportunity, and a magical kind of challenge.\u201d\r\n\r\nWhile Carr has a background in music, jazz was a different animal, especially Bolden\u2019s groundbreaking style. Another issue: Carr\u2019s instrument of choice was the piano, not a horn.\r\n\r\nWith music naturally being a crucial part of BOLDEN, the filmmakers knew there needed to be magic on the soundtrack. Enter Wynton Marsalis.\u00a0 \u201cWe knew we needed someone with the musical prowess and deep passion for New Orleans music, so Wynton Marsalis would be our first (and only), choice to join the project,\u201d says producer Jon Cornick. \u00a0\u201cI had friends in common with Wynton\u2019s manager, Ed Arrendell, and so I contacted him. \u00a0Although Ed was a bit skeptical, he was certainly intrigued and at the end of our conversation, Ed said he would get back to me in a few days. \u00a0Ninety minutes later, he called me and said Wynton would like to have dinner with Dan and I in New York in the coming week! \u00a0It was a great moment when I called Dan to let him know.\"\r\n\r\nAs Nora \u2014\u00a0Buddy Bolden\u2019s wife, who, despite her deep love for Buddy, has to contend with his drinking, womanizing and descent into madness \u2014 Yaya DaCosta (The Nice Guys, And So It Goes, TV\u2019s Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Ugly Betty) connected with the inner fire that Nora found during the difficult times. \"Everyone wants something from Buddy. Nora wants to be in a relationship with the man she loves,\" she says. The role provided a chance to reflect on the era BOLDEN took place in, and the challenges that African-Americans faced in New Orleans across the nation, then and now. \u201cBeing on set in New Orleans, in costume, with all those actors reminded me in a visceral way of what some of my ancestors might have felt,\u201d says DaCosta. \u201cIt was beautiful and scary and powerful. \u00a0It was such a privilege to be in a film like this.\u201d\r\n\r\nSurrounding the actors in sets and costumes that fit the era and the atmosphere was tasked to a production team who knew the perfect notes to hit. Costume designer Colleen Morris, who\u2019s worked on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and The Deuce, created a meticulous wardrobe. Morris was uniquely prepared for the job, with expert knowledge of period fabrics and jazz and Buddy Bolden himself. \u201cMy dad was a huge Louis Armstrong fan, so of course I knew the name Buddy Bolden, but we never could find anything out about him. When I realized what this film was, it was inspiring. It felt like my participation was meant to be,\u201d Morris explains.\r\n\r\nPritzker employed actual dance choreography to inform another character in the movie: Buddy Bolden as a child, who is seen through the adult Buddy\u2019s addled memory and insanity. To underscore the poetic hallucinatory nature of his childhood recollections, Pritzker staged a gorgeous and surreal series of intercuts, transporting us back to his boyhood with his mother, a seamstress. For those scenes, Pritzker enlisted Tony-winning actor choreographer Hinton Battle (Miss Saigon, Sophisticated Ladies) to design an ethereal dance scene.\r\n\r\nJazz legend Wynton Marsalis, an Executive Producer of BOLDEN and the guiding force behind the music in the film, says that he\u2019s hopeful the film will shed light on Buddy Bolden \u201cSo that people can understand another aspect of our history and our culture.\u201d","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"17th April 2019, 16:09:19","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 16:09:19","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-17 20:09:19","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10677","title":"Bolden","content":"Charles \u201cBuddy\u201d Bolden grew up in New Orleans at the end of 19th century to forge a new kind of music. Fusing blues, ragtime, and gospel with an improvisational urgency anchored by his cornet\u2019s sensual sound, Bolden \u201cinvented\u201d jazz, one of America\u2019s few indigenous art forms and its earliest and most important cultural export.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nInspired by the life of Buddy Bolden and told in a dynamically immersive style, the inventive, atmospheric film, from a script by Pritzker and David Rothschild, imagines Bolden\u2019s eventful, tragic life, the social context in which his revolutionary music was conceived, and the resounding influence he had on artists like Louis Armstrong and on the musical form itself.\r\n\r\nBOLDEN has been a passion project for director and writer Dan Pritzker for decades. A guitarist for the Chicago-based rock\/soul\/R&B band Sonia Dada, Pritzker became aware of Bolden\u2019s life story when he was recommended a nonfiction book with a tantalizing description. \u201cI was touring with Sonia Dada, and a friend of mine said he was reading about \u2018this guy who invented jazz\u2019 \u2014 that got my attention!\u201d Pritzker recalls. \u201cIt sounds like a ridiculous concept, like saying someone invented lightning. But Bolden was the shaman who flipped the lights on. Musically, he laid the foundation for what jazz came to be, and for pop culture in America.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u201cDon\u2019s book was an invaluable place to start,\u201d says Pritzker. \u201cIt was basic history, and there were also passages in it that theorized about moments in Bolden\u2019s life. For instance, Marquis conjectured that Bolden went to a certain school because of the way he wrote the letter B, based on the only signature of his we have, on clarinet player Frank White\u2019s marriage certificate.\u201d\r\n\r\nAfter Pritzker contacted Marquis, the author took Pritzker on a tour of locations crucial to Bolden\u2019s New Orleans, including his home and the sites where he played. Then the filmmaker turned to historian Bruce Raeburn, curator of the Hogan Jazz Archives at Tulane University and Assistant Dean of Libraries for Special Collections, who provided vital biographical information about Bolden as well as sociopolitical and historical context and how it related to Bolden\u2019s music. \u201cBeing a musician himself, Dan appreciates American music and how significant it became over the course of the 20th century,\u201d says Raeburn. \u201cHe delved into the historical and cultural context of early twentieth century New Orleans, a complicated place where racism and segregation influenced the way people behaved. In neighborhoods like the Treme and Central City sections, where Bolden grew up, there was a new culture just beginning to realize itself. But it begins with a black vernacular sensibility. It\u2019s the emergence of black voices in the American experience. He brought a passion for Bolden, and that was fundamental to what he wanted to bring to the film.\u201d\r\n\r\nHowever, the more Pritzker researched, the more he realized how scant the historical record of Bolden\u2019s actual life was, including, shockingly, his music, which was never officially recorded. \u201cBolden represents what makes American popular music internationally successful,\u201d says Raeburn \u2014\u00a0yet no recording of him exists, and Bolden never wrote down his arrangements.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Pritzker was initially drawn to British actor Gary Carr because of the actor\u2019s theater experience, sensing that the rigorous training of the stage would allow him to delve into the talent and madness of Bolden in a singularly expressive way. It also helped that Carr \u2014 known in the US for HBO\u2019s The Deuce and a product of \u00a0British Theatre and TV including Downton Abbey and Death in Paradise \u2014 is a trained musician and played a jazz singer on Downton Abbey.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Carr discovered freedom in imagination. \u201cThere was hardly any information about Bolden,\u201d says Carr. \u201cThere was no music for me to reference, not much written or photographic documentation. I had this script and the book In Search of Buddy Bolden, which illustrated what Bolden\u2019s life could have been. However, there was much room for interpretation. It gave me a lot to play with. So, I had the world that he lived in New Orleans, information about the politics of the time and the Jim Crow south, and the way insanity was treated. It was a fascinating opportunity, and a magical kind of challenge.\u201d\r\n\r\nWhile Carr has a background in music, jazz was a different animal, especially Bolden\u2019s groundbreaking style. Another issue: Carr\u2019s instrument of choice was the piano, not a horn.\r\n\r\nWith music naturally being a crucial part of BOLDEN, the filmmakers knew there needed to be magic on the soundtrack. Enter Wynton Marsalis.\u00a0 \u201cWe knew we needed someone with the musical prowess and deep passion for New Orleans music, so Wynton Marsalis would be our first (and only), choice to join the project,\u201d says producer Jon Cornick. \u00a0\u201cI had friends in common with Wynton\u2019s manager, Ed Arrendell, and so I contacted him. \u00a0Although Ed was a bit skeptical, he was certainly intrigued and at the end of our conversation, Ed said he would get back to me in a few days. \u00a0Ninety minutes later, he called me and said Wynton would like to have dinner with Dan and I in New York in the coming week! \u00a0It was a great moment when I called Dan to let him know.\"\r\n\r\nAs Nora \u2014\u00a0Buddy Bolden\u2019s wife, who, despite her deep love for Buddy, has to contend with his drinking, womanizing and descent into madness \u2014 Yaya DaCosta (The Nice Guys, And So It Goes, TV\u2019s Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Ugly Betty) connected with the inner fire that Nora found during the difficult times. \"Everyone wants something from Buddy. Nora wants to be in a relationship with the man she loves,\" she says. The role provided a chance to reflect on the era BOLDEN took place in, and the challenges that African-Americans faced in New Orleans across the nation, then and now. \u201cBeing on set in New Orleans, in costume, with all those actors reminded me in a visceral way of what some of my ancestors might have felt,\u201d says DaCosta. \u201cIt was beautiful and scary and powerful. \u00a0It was such a privilege to be in a film like this.\u201d\r\n\r\nSurrounding the actors in sets and costumes that fit the era and the atmosphere was tasked to a production team who knew the perfect notes to hit. Costume designer Colleen Morris, who\u2019s worked on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and The Deuce, created a meticulous wardrobe. Morris was uniquely prepared for the job, with expert knowledge of period fabrics and jazz and Buddy Bolden himself. \u201cMy dad was a huge Louis Armstrong fan, so of course I knew the name Buddy Bolden, but we never could find anything out about him. When I realized what this film was, it was inspiring. It felt like my participation was meant to be,\u201d Morris explains.\r\n\r\nPritzker employed actual dance choreography to inform another character in the movie: Buddy Bolden as a child, who is seen through the adult Buddy\u2019s addled memory and insanity. To underscore the poetic hallucinatory nature of his childhood recollections, Pritzker staged a gorgeous and surreal series of intercuts, transporting us back to his boyhood with his mother, a seamstress. For those scenes, Pritzker enlisted Tony-winning actor choreographer Hinton Battle (Miss Saigon, Sophisticated Ladies) to design an ethereal dance scene.\r\n\r\nJazz legend Wynton Marsalis, an Executive Producer of BOLDEN and the guiding force behind the music in the film, says that he\u2019s hopeful the film will shed light on Buddy Bolden \u201cSo that people can understand another aspect of our history and our culture.\u201d","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/bolden-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/bolden.jpg","post_excerpt":"Charles \u201cBuddy\u201d Bolden grew up in New Orleans at the end of 19th century to forge a new kind of music. Fusing blues, ragtime, and gospel with an improvisational urgency anchored by his cornet\u2019s sensual sound, Bolden \u201cinvented\u201d jazz, one of America\u2019s few indigenous art forms and its earliest and most important cultural export.","post_date":"17th April 2019, 16:07:59","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 16:07:59","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-17 20:07:59","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10680","title":"Bolden","content":"Charles \u201cBuddy\u201d Bolden grew up in New Orleans at the end of 19th century to forge a new kind of music. Fusing blues, ragtime, and gospel with an improvisational urgency anchored by his cornet\u2019s sensual sound, Bolden \u201cinvented\u201d jazz, one of America\u2019s few indigenous art forms and its earliest and most important cultural export.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nInspired by the life of Buddy Bolden and told in a dynamically immersive style, the inventive, atmospheric film, from a script by Pritzker and David Rothschild, imagines Bolden\u2019s eventful, tragic life, the social context in which his revolutionary music was conceived, and the resounding influence he had on artists like Louis Armstrong and on the musical form itself.\r\n\r\nBOLDEN has been a passion project for director and writer Dan Pritzker for decades. A guitarist for the Chicago-based rock\/soul\/R&B band Sonia Dada, Pritzker became aware of Bolden\u2019s life story when he was recommended a nonfiction book with a tantalizing description. \u201cI was touring with Sonia Dada, and a friend of mine said he was reading about \u2018this guy who invented jazz\u2019 \u2014 that got my attention!\u201d Pritzker recalls. \u201cIt sounds like a ridiculous concept, like saying someone invented lightning. But Bolden was the shaman who flipped the lights on. Musically, he laid the foundation for what jazz came to be, and for pop culture in America.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u201cDon\u2019s book was an invaluable place to start,\u201d says Pritzker. \u201cIt was basic history, and there were also passages in it that theorized about moments in Bolden\u2019s life. For instance, Marquis conjectured that Bolden went to a certain school because of the way he wrote the letter B, based on the only signature of his we have, on clarinet player Frank White\u2019s marriage certificate.\u201d\r\n\r\nAfter Pritzker contacted Marquis, the author took Pritzker on a tour of locations crucial to Bolden\u2019s New Orleans, including his home and the sites where he played. Then the filmmaker turned to historian Bruce Raeburn, curator of the Hogan Jazz Archives at Tulane University and Assistant Dean of Libraries for Special Collections, who provided vital biographical information about Bolden as well as sociopolitical and historical context and how it related to Bolden\u2019s music. \u201cBeing a musician himself, Dan appreciates American music and how significant it became over the course of the 20th century,\u201d says Raeburn. \u201cHe delved into the historical and cultural context of early twentieth century New Orleans, a complicated place where racism and segregation influenced the way people behaved. In neighborhoods like the Treme and Central City sections, where Bolden grew up, there was a new culture just beginning to realize itself. But it begins with a black vernacular sensibility. It\u2019s the emergence of black voices in the American experience. He brought a passion for Bolden, and that was fundamental to what he wanted to bring to the film.\u201d\r\n\r\nHowever, the more Pritzker researched, the more he realized how scant the historical record of Bolden\u2019s actual life was, including, shockingly, his music, which was never officially recorded. \u201cBolden represents what makes American popular music internationally successful,\u201d says Raeburn \u2014\u00a0yet no recording of him exists, and Bolden never wrote down his arrangements.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Pritzker was initially drawn to British actor Gary Carr because of the actor\u2019s theater experience, sensing that the rigorous training of the stage would allow him to delve into the talent and madness of Bolden in a singularly expressive way. It also helped that Carr \u2014 known in the US for HBO\u2019s The Deuce and a product of \u00a0British Theatre and TV including Downton Abbey and Death in Paradise \u2014 is a trained musician and played a jazz singer on Downton Abbey.\r\n\r\nTo play Buddy Bolden, Carr discovered freedom in imagination. \u201cThere was hardly any information about Bolden,\u201d says Carr. \u201cThere was no music for me to reference, not much written or photographic documentation. I had this script and the book In Search of Buddy Bolden, which illustrated what Bolden\u2019s life could have been. However, there was much room for interpretation. It gave me a lot to play with. So, I had the world that he lived in New Orleans, information about the politics of the time and the Jim Crow south, and the way insanity was treated. It was a fascinating opportunity, and a magical kind of challenge.\u201d\r\n\r\nWhile Carr has a background in music, jazz was a different animal, especially Bolden\u2019s groundbreaking style. Another issue: Carr\u2019s instrument of choice was the piano, not a horn.\r\n\r\nWith music naturally being a crucial part of BOLDEN, the filmmakers knew there needed to be magic on the soundtrack. Enter Wynton Marsalis.\u00a0 \u201cWe knew we needed someone with the musical prowess and deep passion for New Orleans music, so Wynton Marsalis would be our first (and only), choice to join the project,\u201d says producer Jon Cornick. \u00a0\u201cI had friends in common with Wynton\u2019s manager, Ed Arrendell, and so I contacted him. \u00a0Although Ed was a bit skeptical, he was certainly intrigued and at the end of our conversation, Ed said he would get back to me in a few days. \u00a0Ninety minutes later, he called me and said Wynton would like to have dinner with Dan and I in New York in the coming week! \u00a0It was a great moment when I called Dan to let him know.\"\r\n\r\nAs Nora \u2014\u00a0Buddy Bolden\u2019s wife, who, despite her deep love for Buddy, has to contend with his drinking, womanizing and descent into madness \u2014 Yaya DaCosta (The Nice Guys, And So It Goes, TV\u2019s Chicago Med, Chicago Fire, and Ugly Betty) connected with the inner fire that Nora found during the difficult times. \"Everyone wants something from Buddy. Nora wants to be in a relationship with the man she loves,\" she says. The role provided a chance to reflect on the era BOLDEN took place in, and the challenges that African-Americans faced in New Orleans across the nation, then and now. \u201cBeing on set in New Orleans, in costume, with all those actors reminded me in a visceral way of what some of my ancestors might have felt,\u201d says DaCosta. \u201cIt was beautiful and scary and powerful. \u00a0It was such a privilege to be in a film like this.\u201d\r\n\r\nSurrounding the actors in sets and costumes that fit the era and the atmosphere was tasked to a production team who knew the perfect notes to hit. Costume designer Colleen Morris, who\u2019s worked on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and The Deuce, created a meticulous wardrobe. Morris was uniquely prepared for the job, with expert knowledge of period fabrics and jazz and Buddy Bolden himself. \u201cMy dad was a huge Louis Armstrong fan, so of course I knew the name Buddy Bolden, but we never could find anything out about him. When I realized what this film was, it was inspiring. It felt like my participation was meant to be,\u201d Morris explains.\r\n\r\nPritzker employed actual dance choreography to inform another character in the movie: Buddy Bolden as a child, who is seen through the adult Buddy\u2019s addled memory and insanity. To underscore the poetic hallucinatory nature of his childhood recollections, Pritzker staged a gorgeous and surreal series of intercuts, transporting us back to his boyhood with his mother, a seamstress. For those scenes, Pritzker enlisted Tony-winning actor choreographer Hinton Battle (Miss Saigon, Sophisticated Ladies) to design an ethereal dance scene.\r\n\r\nJazz legend Wynton Marsalis, an Executive Producer of BOLDEN and the guiding force behind the music in the film, says that he\u2019s hopeful the film will shed light on Buddy Bolden \u201cSo that people can understand another aspect of our history and our culture.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u00a0\r\n\r\n\u00a0","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"17th April 2019, 16:07:21","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 16:07:21","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-17 20:07:21","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10679","title":"bolden","content":"","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/bolden-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/bolden.jpg","post_excerpt":"","post_date":"17th April 2019, 16:06:15","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 16:06:15","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-17 20:06:15","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10678","title":"bolden-poster","content":"Not many people have heard of Buddy Bolden, but his musical influence has touched each one of us. In director DAN PRITZKER\u2019s captivating and unique drama BOLDEN, this haunted figure is portrayed by GARY CARR both in his prime and in the bleak Louisiana insane asylum where he spent the last 25 years of his life. While Louis Armstrong (RENO WILSON) performs a seminal concert in New Orleans \u2014 the first time an African-American musician spoke on the radio \u2014 Buddy Bolden\u2019s mind wanders back to New Orleans when he was known as \"King Bolden.\" ","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/bolden-poster-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/bolden-poster.jpg","post_excerpt":"Not many people have heard of Buddy Bolden, but his musical influence has touched each one of us. In director DAN PRITZKER\u2019s captivating and unique drama BOLDEN, this haunted figure is portrayed by GARY CARR both in his prime and in the bleak Louisiana insane asylum where he spent the last 25 years of his life. While Louis Armstrong (RENO WILSON) performs a seminal concert in New Orleans \u2014 the first time an African-American musician spoke on the radio \u2014 Buddy Bolden\u2019s mind wanders back to New Orleans when he was known as \"King Bolden.\" ","post_date":"17th April 2019, 16:04:51","french_date":"17 avril 2019, 16:04:51","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-17 20:04:51","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10676","title":"Desert Dancer","content":"Desert Dancer follows the true, inspiring story of a brave Iranian dancer, Afshin Ghaffarian. Set in Tehran during the volatile climate of the 2009 presidential election and the start of the \u201cGreen Movement,\u201d Afshin and a group of dancers (including \u201cElaheh\u201d played by Freida Pinto) risk their lives and form an underground dance company.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nA few weeks after the premiere of Heartless director Richard Raymond read a news story about an Iranian dancer named Afshin Ghaffarian who was arrested after putting on a performance in the desert. \u201cI had no prior connection to dance, and I never in a million years thought it would be the subject of my first feature but I found it to be absolutely fascinating as an artist and a filmmaker.\u201d said Raymond\r\n\r\n\r\nIt took many months to convince Afshin to share his story, until finally Raymond and writer Jon Croker flew to meet him in Paris. They spent eight hours listening and recording Ghaffarian\u2019s incredible story of resistance and resilience. This interview became the framework for their screenplay.\r\n\r\nAs he prepared to undertake his first feature film, Raymond had to convince financiers that he was the right person to helm the project. So the young director decided to film a promo piece with portions of a \u201cdesert dance\u201d scene in the Wadi Rum desert in Jordan, with Ghaffarian playing himself.\r\n\r\nThe Jordanian authorities had other ideas. Afshin wasn't allowed to be in the country. When Raymond inquired why, the authorities explained that because he was a male dancer, he must also be a homosexual.\r\n\r\nFortunately, Raymond had an idea. He had recently seen The Lovely Bones and been impressed with Reece Ritchie in a small role. Beyond being a tremendous actor, Ritchie has significant martial arts training so Raymond knew he could handle the strenuous dance sequences. Ritchie had additional qualities that did not go unnoticed. The physical likeness he had to Afshin was uncanny. The actor called his agent and said \u201cI'm playing this part, come hell or high water.\u201d Reece got on the next plane to Jordan, and almost immediately found himself dancing in the desert.\r\n\r\nHe was particularly sensitive to the challenge of casting \u201cElaheh,\u201d a trained dancer who helped Ghaffarian and his friends refine their dance skills. \u201cElaheh,\u201d is also the woman Ghaffarian loved and had to leave when he escaped Iran.\r\n\r\nAfter honing the script, Raymond sent it to Hylda Queally\u2019s office (Freida Pinto\u2019s agent) for Freida and the Slumdog Millionaire actress immediately responded to it. In trying to secure Pinto for the role, Raymond was very mindful of being \u201ca first-time director with no credentials\u201d but felt confident that he had a great story.\r\n\r\nOn first reading of the script, Pinto recalled, \u201cElaheh\u2019s character literally popped off the page. Not only was it a role I had never done before, I was also inspired to portray the voice of repressed youth who don\u2019t have any hope.\u201d\r\n\r\nThere were no body doubles in Desert Dancer. Pinto trained for a year and Raymond waited for the financing. There was a moment where Raymond thought he may have to use a body-double to film the more challenging sequences. But as they readied a complicated scene something shined through in Freida during her dance. Raymond realized Pinto was more than capable of performing the sequences herself and did not need a double.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Desert Dancer follows the true, inspiring story of a brave Iranian dancer, Afshin Ghaffarian. Set in Tehran during the volatile climate of the 2009 presidential electio, Afshin and a group of dancers risk their lives and form an underground dance company.","post_date":"16th April 2019, 11:46:09","french_date":"16 avril 2019, 11:46:09","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-16 15:46:09","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10671","title":"The Intruder","content":"When a young married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) buys their dream house in the Napa Valley, they think they have found the perfect home to take their next steps as a family. But when the strangely attached seller (Dennis Quaid) continues to infiltrate their lives, they begin to suspect that he has hidden motivations beyond a quick sale.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nScreenwriter David Loughery is no stranger to the kind of domestic thriller that puts everyday people in the crosshairs of unhinged interlopers, as evidenced by the movies Lakeview Terrace and Obsessed. When he was searching for a new vein of highly charged menace around which to build a screenplay, he thought about a certain community staple.\r\n\r\nSays Loughery, \u201cIn every neighborhood, there\u2019s an older, retired guy who is completely obsessed with his house and his property, and his yard, and he keeps everything in meticulous shape, and it\u2019s a reflection of him. The house, the property, represents him. And I thought, what if a guy like this had to give up his property? Had to sell his property? Was forced to do it. Would he be able to really let go of that place? Would he be able to stay away, or would he have to come back and make sure that the people he sold it to were taking care of it in the way that he needed them to take care of it?\u201d\r\n\r\nThat inspiration led to the creation of unnervingly fixated retiree Charlie Peck, a disturbing scenario that arises from a married couple purchasing his house, and a screenplay that was at the time called Motivated Seller. After a few years in which it sat in Loughery\u2019s drawer \u2013 \u201cI didn\u2019t really know what to do with it,\u201d says Loughery \u2013 the writer\u2019s manager eventually read it, and realized it needed to be made. When the script got into the hands of producer Mark Burg of the Saw franchise, the ball was rolling.\r\n\r\nSays Burg, \u201cDavid wrote Lakeview Terrace, which I thought was great. He wrote Obsessed, which I thought was terrific, and he wrote Passenger 57, which I loved. He just created a really unique idea, and I happened to be on the set of a movie called Traffik, directed by Deon Taylor, and I said, \u2018Deon, I just read this script on the plane. You may want to check this out, I think there\u2019s something to this.\u2019 He\u2019s in the middle of directing a movie, and he calls me the next day and says, \u2018I love it. I want to make it.\u2019 It all happened very quick, over a Saturday morning.\u201d\r\n\r\nLoughery couldn\u2019t believe how rapidly the movie was coming together. \u201cWithin a week, I had met Deon and loved the guy,\u201d he says. \u201cHe loved the script. This is the fastest I\u2019ve ever seen a script go into production. [Deon] made it come true, and it\u2019s really a thrill. Most of the directors I run into are just very jaded, a lot laid back, but Deon just has this kind of life force that makes you feel like, \u2018Wow, I\u2019ve got to get on the train with this guy \u2018cause I think he\u2019s going somewhere.\u2019\u201d\r\n\r\nWhen it came to making Charlie Peck a flesh-and-blood figure of sympathy, then pity, then deception and menace, director Deon Taylor had only a few people in mind to play the character, but at the top of that list was versatile, acclaimed actor Dennis Quaid. His pitch to the actor was simple: he wanted to give Quaid a shot at his own Jack Torrance in The Shining or Annie Wilkes in Misery, roles that Jack Nicholson and Kathy Bates, respectively, turned into iconic cinematic nightmares for audiences everywhere. Screenwriter David Loughery has known Quaid for decades, since Quaid starred in Loughery\u2019s first produced script, Dreamscape, and says Quaid was on his mind from the moment he was putting Charlie to paper.\r\n\r\nNailing down the source of your movie\u2019s terror is one thing, casting the right actors to play Annie and Scott, the loving couple whose own sensitive relationship is given a workover by Charlie\u2019s interloping ways, was just as tricky. Luckily, the creative team landed Meagan Good to embody the harrowing journey Annie goes through. Good had already met with Deon Taylor once on a different project, so when the actress got her hands on The Intruder, knowing Taylor was involved, she got especially excited. In Annie, Good had a meaty role with a delicate mission: make her initial trust in Charlie believable, until the writing was on the wall.\r\n\r\nMichael Ealy, was cast as Annie\u2019s husband Scott. Ealy was attracted to The Intruder not only because it was a powerful story with a nail-biting premise, but that it offered a chance to work opposite Dennis Quaid. \u201cHe was a big factor in why I decided to do it,\u201d says Ealy. \u201cI kind of grew up on his work. The first time I remember seeing him was in Enemy Mine opposite Lou Gossett, Jr. and he was incredible. He\u2019s just got such a legacy in terms of who he\u2019s worked with, and his consistency as an actor. It was an opportunity to play with Roger Federer, and I want to play against the best.\u201d\r\n\r\nThere\u2019s no The Intruder without a house for Charlie Peck to obsess over, and with Vancouver needing to sub for the Napa Valley, the search for the right estate to enchant Scott and Annie \u2013 and inspire terrifying behavior in Charlie \u2013 was a central quest for the creative team.\r\n\r\nDirector Deon Taylor credits veteran Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Dante Spinotti, whom he worked with on Traffik, with instilling in him the importance of a great location. Says Taylor, \u201cAs a filmmaker, you look at locations all the time, \u2018That\u2019s cool, that\u2019s great,\u2019 but do you really take time to look at the location? Dante was one of the first people to ever sit me down and explain to me how important a location was to a scene. So when we got ready to do a movie like this, we were riding all around Vancouver looking. I looked at 70 houses at least, maybe 150 when I count online. But it was the same cabin you see in every movie. It was just a house, the house you see on the posters for a scary movie. And I\u2019m like man, that\u2019s not it.\u201d\r\n\r\nProducer Roxanne Avent says she prefers a practical location to a set because she believes audiences respond more to a real place, but even she couldn\u2019t believe the production\u2019s luck that they found Foxglove, and how it spoke to the romance in the story, and the scary parts later.\r\n\r\nAs accommodating as the owners were to a month of shooting at their home, they still needed to okay changes production designer Andrew Neskoromny wanted to make to the outside so that it fit the story they were trying to tell. Mostly that meant trimming enough of the covering foliage so that the house could be more easily seen, painting shutters, installing a new door, and working on the exterior walls to the extent that the house\u2019s historical splendor remained, yet looked like an ongoing project for a fastidious owner like Charlie.\r\n\r\nNormally for a movie so dependent on one location, interiors would be built on a stage. But Taylor wanted to shoot at the house as much as possible, which Neskoromny looked at as a worthy challenge. \u201cThere was a certain claustrophobic quality to it that he didn\u2019t want to lose,\u201d says Neskoromny. \u201cAnd sometimes you can lose that within a set, because the walls can come apart, everything is flexible, and you\u2019re able to get a camera anywhere you want, even be below the floor. You can\u2019t do that at a practical location. At the same time, there are challenges, because you\u2019re dealing with stunts, and you have to change doorways, and remodel the architecture in certain areas, all within existing parameters. All of those things were an added level of challenge in working in this house as opposed to building a set.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u00a0","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/the-intruder-movie-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/the-intruder-movie.jpg","post_excerpt":"When a young married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) buys their dream house in the Napa Valley, they think they have found the perfect home to take their next steps as a family. But when the strangely attached seller (Dennis Quaid) continues to infiltrate their lives, they begin to suspect that he has hidden motivations beyond a quick sale.","post_date":"16th April 2019, 11:39:46","french_date":"16 avril 2019, 11:39:46","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-16 15:39:46","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10675","title":"The Intruder","content":"When a young married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) buys their dream house in the Napa Valley, they think they have found the perfect home to take their next steps as a family. But when the strangely attached seller (Dennis Quaid) continues to infiltrate their lives, they begin to suspect that he has hidden motivations beyond a quick sale.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nScreenwriter David Loughery is no stranger to the kind of domestic thriller that puts everyday people in the crosshairs of unhinged interlopers, as evidenced by the movies Lakeview Terrace and Obsessed. When he was searching for a new vein of highly charged menace around which to build a screenplay, he thought about a certain community staple.\r\n\r\nSays Loughery, \u201cIn every neighborhood, there\u2019s an older, retired guy who is completely obsessed with his house and his property, and his yard, and he keeps everything in meticulous shape, and it\u2019s a reflection of him. The house, the property, represents him. And I thought, what if a guy like this had to give up his property? Had to sell his property? Was forced to do it. Would he be able to really let go of that place? Would he be able to stay away, or would he have to come back and make sure that the people he sold it to were taking care of it in the way that he needed them to take care of it?\u201d\r\n\r\nThat inspiration led to the creation of unnervingly fixated retiree Charlie Peck, a disturbing scenario that arises from a married couple purchasing his house, and a screenplay that was at the time called Motivated Seller. After a few years in which it sat in Loughery\u2019s drawer \u2013 \u201cI didn\u2019t really know what to do with it,\u201d says Loughery \u2013 the writer\u2019s manager eventually read it, and realized it needed to be made. When the script got into the hands of producer Mark Burg of the Saw franchise, the ball was rolling.\r\n\r\nSays Burg, \u201cDavid wrote Lakeview Terrace, which I thought was great. He wrote Obsessed, which I thought was terrific, and he wrote Passenger 57, which I loved. He just created a really unique idea, and I happened to be on the set of a movie called Traffik, directed by Deon Taylor, and I said, \u2018Deon, I just read this script on the plane. You may want to check this out, I think there\u2019s something to this.\u2019 He\u2019s in the middle of directing a movie, and he calls me the next day and says, \u2018I love it. I want to make it.\u2019 It all happened very quick, over a Saturday morning.\u201d\r\n\r\nLoughery couldn\u2019t believe how rapidly the movie was coming together. \u201cWithin a week, I had met Deon and loved the guy,\u201d he says. \u201cHe loved the script. This is the fastest I\u2019ve ever seen a script go into production. [Deon] made it come true, and it\u2019s really a thrill. Most of the directors I run into are just very jaded, a lot laid back, but Deon just has this kind of life force that makes you feel like, \u2018Wow, I\u2019ve got to get on the train with this guy \u2018cause I think he\u2019s going somewhere.\u2019\u201d\r\n\r\nWhen it came to making Charlie Peck a flesh-and-blood figure of sympathy, then pity, then deception and menace, director Deon Taylor had only a few people in mind to play the character, but at the top of that list was versatile, acclaimed actor Dennis Quaid. His pitch to the actor was simple: he wanted to give Quaid a shot at his own Jack Torrance in The Shining or Annie Wilkes in Misery, roles that Jack Nicholson and Kathy Bates, respectively, turned into iconic cinematic nightmares for audiences everywhere. Screenwriter David Loughery has known Quaid for decades, since Quaid starred in Loughery\u2019s first produced script, Dreamscape, and says Quaid was on his mind from the moment he was putting Charlie to paper.\r\n\r\nNailing down the source of your movie\u2019s terror is one thing, casting the right actors to play Annie and Scott, the loving couple whose own sensitive relationship is given a workover by Charlie\u2019s interloping ways, was just as tricky. Luckily, the creative team landed Meagan Good to embody the harrowing journey Annie goes through. Good had already met with Deon Taylor once on a different project, so when the actress got her hands on The Intruder, knowing Taylor was involved, she got especially excited. In Annie, Good had a meaty role with a delicate mission: make her initial trust in Charlie believable, until the writing was on the wall.\r\n\r\nMichael Ealy, was cast as Annie\u2019s husband Scott. Ealy was attracted to The Intruder not only because it was a powerful story with a nail-biting premise, but that it offered a chance to work opposite Dennis Quaid. \u201cHe was a big factor in why I decided to do it,\u201d says Ealy. \u201cI kind of grew up on his work. The first time I remember seeing him was in Enemy Mine opposite Lou Gossett, Jr. and he was incredible. He\u2019s just got such a legacy in terms of who he\u2019s worked with, and his consistency as an actor. It was an opportunity to play with Roger Federer, and I want to play against the best.\u201d\r\n\r\nThere\u2019s no The Intruder without a house for Charlie Peck to obsess over, and with Vancouver needing to sub for the Napa Valley, the search for the right estate to enchant Scott and Annie \u2013 and inspire terrifying behavior in Charlie \u2013 was a central quest for the creative team.\r\n\r\nDirector Deon Taylor credits veteran Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Dante Spinotti, whom he worked with on Traffik, with instilling in him the importance of a great location. Says Taylor, \u201cAs a filmmaker, you look at locations all the time, \u2018That\u2019s cool, that\u2019s great,\u2019 but do you really take time to look at the location? Dante was one of the first people to ever sit me down and explain to me how important a location was to a scene. So when we got ready to do a movie like this, we were riding all around Vancouver looking. I looked at 70 houses at least, maybe 150 when I count online. But it was the same cabin you see in every movie. It was just a house, the house you see on the posters for a scary movie. And I\u2019m like man, that\u2019s not it.\u201d\r\n\r\nProducer Roxanne Avent says she prefers a practical location to a set because she believes audiences respond more to a real place, but even she couldn\u2019t believe the production\u2019s luck that they found Foxglove, and how it spoke to the romance in the story, and the scary parts later.\r\n\r\nAs accommodating as the owners were to a month of shooting at their home, they still needed to okay changes production designer Andrew Neskoromny wanted to make to the outside so that it fit the story they were trying to tell. Mostly that meant trimming enough of the covering foliage so that the house could be more easily seen, painting shutters, installing a new door, and working on the exterior walls to the extent that the house\u2019s historical splendor remained, yet looked like an ongoing project for a fastidious owner like Charlie.\r\n\r\nNormally for a movie so dependent on one location, interiors would be built on a stage. But Taylor wanted to shoot at the house as much as possible, which Neskoromny looked at as a worthy challenge. \u201cThere was a certain claustrophobic quality to it that he didn\u2019t want to lose,\u201d says Neskoromny. \u201cAnd sometimes you can lose that within a set, because the walls can come apart, everything is flexible, and you\u2019re able to get a camera anywhere you want, even be below the floor. You can\u2019t do that at a practical location. At the same time, there are challenges, because you\u2019re dealing with stunts, and you have to change doorways, and remodel the architecture in certain areas, all within existing parameters. All of those things were an added level of challenge in working in this house as opposed to building a set.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u00a0","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"When a young married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) buys their dream house in the Napa Valley, they think they have found the perfect home to take their next steps as a family. But when the strangely attached seller (Dennis Quaid) continues to infiltrate their lives, they begin to suspect that he has hidden motivations beyond a quick sale.","post_date":"16th April 2019, 11:39:46","french_date":"16 avril 2019, 11:39:46","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-16 15:39:46","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10674","title":"The Intruder","content":"When a young married couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) buys their dream house in the Napa Valley, they think they have found the perfect home to take their next steps as a family. But when the strangely attached seller (Dennis Quaid) continues to infiltrate their lives, they begin to suspect that he has hidden motivations beyond a quick sale.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nScreenwriter David Loughery is no stranger to the kind of domestic thriller that puts everyday people in the crosshairs of unhinged interlopers, as evidenced by the movies Lakeview Terrace and Obsessed. When he was searching for a new vein of highly charged menace around which to build a screenplay, he thought about a certain community staple.\r\n\r\nSays Loughery, \u201cIn every neighborhood, there\u2019s an older, retired guy who is completely obsessed with his house and his property, and his yard, and he keeps everything in meticulous shape, and it\u2019s a reflection of him. The house, the property, represents him. And I thought, what if a guy like this had to give up his property? Had to sell his property? Was forced to do it. Would he be able to really let go of that place? Would he be able to stay away, or would he have to come back and make sure that the people he sold it to were taking care of it in the way that he needed them to take care of it?\u201d\r\n\r\nThat inspiration led to the creation of unnervingly fixated retiree Charlie Peck, a disturbing scenario that arises from a married couple purchasing his house, and a screenplay that was at the time called Motivated Seller. After a few years in which it sat in Loughery\u2019s drawer \u2013 \u201cI didn\u2019t really know what to do with it,\u201d says Loughery \u2013 the writer\u2019s manager eventually read it, and realized it needed to be made. When the script got into the hands of producer Mark Burg of the Saw franchise, the ball was rolling.\r\n\r\nSays Burg, \u201cDavid wrote Lakeview Terrace, which I thought was great. He wrote Obsessed, which I thought was terrific, and he wrote Passenger 57, which I loved. He just created a really unique idea, and I happened to be on the set of a movie called Traffik, directed by Deon Taylor, and I said, \u2018Deon, I just read this script on the plane. You may want to check this out, I think there\u2019s something to this.\u2019 He\u2019s in the middle of directing a movie, and he calls me the next day and says, \u2018I love it. I want to make it.\u2019 It all happened very quick, over a Saturday morning.\u201d\r\n\r\nLoughery couldn\u2019t believe how rapidly the movie was coming together. \u201cWithin a week, I had met Deon and loved the guy,\u201d he says. \u201cHe loved the script. This is the fastest I\u2019ve ever seen a script go into production. [Deon] made it come true, and it\u2019s really a thrill. Most of the directors I run into are just very jaded, a lot laid back, but Deon just has this kind of life force that makes you feel like, \u2018Wow, I\u2019ve got to get on the train with this guy \u2018cause I think he\u2019s going somewhere.\u2019\u201d\r\n\r\nWhen it came to making Charlie Peck a flesh-and-blood figure of sympathy, then pity, then deception and menace, director Deon Taylor had only a few people in mind to play the character, but at the top of that list was versatile, acclaimed actor Dennis Quaid. His pitch to the actor was simple: he wanted to give Quaid a shot at his own Jack Torrance in The Shining or Annie Wilkes in Misery, roles that Jack Nicholson and Kathy Bates, respectively, turned into iconic cinematic nightmares for audiences everywhere. Screenwriter David Loughery has known Quaid for decades, since Quaid starred in Loughery\u2019s first produced script, Dreamscape, and says Quaid was on his mind from the moment he was putting Charlie to paper.\r\n\r\nNailing down the source of your movie\u2019s terror is one thing, casting the right actors to play Annie and Scott, the loving couple whose own sensitive relationship is given a workover by Charlie\u2019s interloping ways, was just as tricky. Luckily, the creative team landed Meagan Good to embody the harrowing journey Annie goes through. Good had already met with Deon Taylor once on a different project, so when the actress got her hands on The Intruder, knowing Taylor was involved, she got especially excited. In Annie, Good had a meaty role with a delicate mission: make her initial trust in Charlie believable, until the writing was on the wall.\r\n\r\nMichael Ealy, was cast as Annie\u2019s husband Scott. Ealy was attracted to The Intruder not only because it was a powerful story with a nail-biting premise, but that it offered a chance to work opposite Dennis Quaid. \u201cHe was a big factor in why I decided to do it,\u201d says Ealy. \u201cI kind of grew up on his work. The first time I remember seeing him was in Enemy Mine opposite Lou Gossett, Jr. and he was incredible. He\u2019s just got such a legacy in terms of who he\u2019s worked with, and his consistency as an actor. It was an opportunity to play with Roger Federer, and I want to play against the best.\u201d\r\n\r\nThere\u2019s no The Intruder without a house for Charlie Peck to obsess over, and with Vancouver needing to sub for the Napa Valley, the search for the right estate to enchant Scott and Annie \u2013 and inspire terrifying behavior in Charlie \u2013 was a central quest for the creative team.\r\n\r\nDirector Deon Taylor credits veteran Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Dante Spinotti, whom he worked with on Traffik, with instilling in him the importance of a great location. Says Taylor, \u201cAs a filmmaker, you look at locations all the time, \u2018That\u2019s cool, that\u2019s great,\u2019 but do you really take time to look at the location? Dante was one of the first people to ever sit me down and explain to me how important a location was to a scene. So when we got ready to do a movie like this, we were riding all around Vancouver looking. I looked at 70 houses at least, maybe 150 when I count online. But it was the same cabin you see in every movie. It was just a house, the house you see on the posters for a scary movie. And I\u2019m like man, that\u2019s not it.\u201d\r\n\r\nProducer Roxanne Avent says she prefers a practical location to a set because she believes audiences respond more to a real place, but even she couldn\u2019t believe the production\u2019s luck that they found Foxglove, and how it spoke to the romance in the story, and the scary parts later.\r\n\r\nAs accommodating as the owners were to a month of shooting at their home, they still needed to okay changes production designer Andrew Neskoromny wanted to make to the outside so that it fit the story they were trying to tell. Mostly that meant trimming enough of the covering foliage so that the house could be more easily seen, painting shutters, installing a new door, and working on the exterior walls to the extent that the house\u2019s historical splendor remained, yet looked like an ongoing project for a fastidious owner like Charlie.\r\n\r\nNormally for a movie so dependent on one location, interiors would be built on a stage. But Taylor wanted to shoot at the house as much as possible, which Neskoromny looked at as a worthy challenge. \u201cThere was a certain claustrophobic quality to it that he didn\u2019t want to lose,\u201d says Neskoromny. \u201cAnd sometimes you can lose that within a set, because the walls can come apart, everything is flexible, and you\u2019re able to get a camera anywhere you want, even be below the floor. You can\u2019t do that at a practical location. At the same time, there are challenges, because you\u2019re dealing with stunts, and you have to change doorways, and remodel the architecture in certain areas, all within existing parameters. All of those things were an added level of challenge in working in this house as opposed to building a set.\u201d\r\n\r\n\u00a0","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"16th April 2019, 11:36:59","french_date":"16 avril 2019, 11:36:59","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-16 15:36:59","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10673","title":"the-intruder","content":"THE INTRUDER is directed by Deon Taylor (Traffik) and written by David Loughery (Lakeview Terrace), who also Executive Produces. The film stars Michael Ealy (Think Like a Man Too, The Perfect Guy) as Scott, Meagan Good (Shazam!, A Boy. A Girl. A Dream.) as Annie, Joseph Sikora (Starz\u2019s Power) as Mike, and Dennis Quaid (A Dog\u2019s Purpose, I Can Only Imagine) as Charlie.","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/the-intruder-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/the-intruder.jpg","post_excerpt":"THE INTRUDER is directed by Deon Taylor (Traffik) and written by David Loughery (Lakeview Terrace), who also Executive Produces. The film stars Michael Ealy (Think Like a Man Too, The Perfect Guy) as Scott, Meagan Good (Shazam!, A Boy. A Girl. A Dream.) as Annie, Joseph Sikora (Starz\u2019s Power) as Mike, and Dennis Quaid (A Dog\u2019s Purpose, I Can Only Imagine) as Charlie.","post_date":"16th April 2019, 11:32:36","french_date":"16 avril 2019, 11:32:36","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-16 15:32:36","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10672","title":"the-intruder-movie","content":"","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/the-intruder-movie-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/04\/the-intruder-movie.jpg","post_excerpt":"","post_date":"16th April 2019, 11:32:14","french_date":"16 avril 2019, 11:32:14","post_date_gmt":"2019-04-16 15:32:14","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"}]