[{"id":"10835","title":"Brian Banks","content":"In 2002, high school athlete Brian Banks was falsely accused of rape and kidnapping by a female classmate in Long Beach, California. Although he experienced a real-life nightmare that would have destroyed most other people, Banks survived five years behind bars and another five on probation. His story of perseverance gained widespread media attention in 2012 when he was exonerated with the help of the California Innocence Project.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nFilm producer Amy Baer (Last Vegas, Mary Shelley) of Gidden Media saw a news report about Banks\u2019 remarkable case on a Los Angeles TV station and knew instantly it was a story important enough to be shared on the big screen. \u201cBrian\u2019s tale of survival was incredibly compelling,\u201d she says. \u201cHere was a young man trying to reclaim a decade of his life that was stolen from him, and I felt that turning his past into a movie might be a way of transforming that negative moment into a positive one.\u201d\r\n\r\nThree years later, \u201c60 Minutes\u201d aired a major report on Banks, which productrice Shivani Rawat (Trumbo, Captain Fantastic) happened to see. Shortly thereafter, Baer met with Rawat and her producing partner Monica Levinson (Danny Collins, Beirut) and asked if they would be interested in developing a feature with her. \u201cI didn\u2019t even let Amy finish before I told her I was in,\u201d says Rawat. \u201cMonica and I really wanted to tell this story with her.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe three producers traveled to New York to meet with Banks in person, and were each impressed with his indomitable spirit and positivity. \u201cBrian lights up the room when he walks in,\u201d says Levinson. \u201cHe just makes you happy, and every time you look at him you think: \u2018How can you have gone through such a terrible experience and still be that human right now?\u2019\u201d\r\n\r\nTo turn Banks\u2019 story into a script, Baer reached out to award-winning screenwriter Doug Atchison. \u201cAmy was aware of a film I\u2019d written and directed called Akeelah and the Bee,\u201d says Atchison. \u201cCuriously enough, Brian actually saw that film while he was in prison. He had the ability to check out DVDs, so he watched it and told me later that it inspired him. Apparently when Amy and her team were talking with him about writers to tell his story, my name came up and he responded positively.\u201d\r\n\r\nAfter signing on to write the script, Atchison met with Banks and discussed the events surrounding his wrongful incarceration. \u201cHearing this young man talk about what had happened to him in solitary confinement, and how he was able to get through it, really drew me in. He\u2019d been waiting years to tell this story in its entirety, and that\u2019s what he did. He told me about his whole life.\u201d\r\n\r\nIn the film\u2019s title role, award-winning actor Aldis Hodge (Hidden Figures, Straight Outta Compton) delivers a performance of rare insight and depth, due in large part to the emotional bond he felt with Banks. \u201cI knew instantly that this would be a special project for me because I really connected with the story and the character,\u201d says Hodge. \u201cSomething about the way Doug wrote it just sparked my attention.\u201d\r\n\r\nHodge admits to being nervous going into his first audition because of how badly he wanted the role. \u201cThen about a week later, they asked me to come in again and meet with Tom Shadyac,\u201d he recalls. \u201cIt was actually more of a discussion about who I was as a person. Tom really wanted to learn about me because he was searching for an element of synergy between Brian and the actor cast to portray him.\u201d\r\n\r\nBetween that first and second audition, Hodge hit the gym and began bulking up. \u201cI knew if I wanted this job I\u2019d have to be prepared for it,\u201d he says. \u201cSo, when Tom finally saw me, he said, \u2018Man, you put on some weight!\u2019 I think he respected the fact that I was showing him I was ready to do the work.\u201d\r\n\r\nBanks was working for the National Football League at the time, so the two men met at an NFL office in New York to talk things over. \u201cIt wasn\u2019t football season, so we had this big conference room all to ourselves,\u201d Atchison explains. \u201cI brought my camera with me and recorded about 13 hours of Brian telling me his life story, from beginning to end. It was my job to ask the right questions in order to extract all the facts of what happened and how he felt about it.\u201d\r\n\r\nBanks says he agreed to have his life made into a feature film because he\u2019s committed to helping others who are struggling in a similar situation. \u201cBy telling my story in this movie, I hope that we can prevent, or at least minimize, wrongful convictions from continuing to happen in the future. The truth is that wrongful convictions and social injustices don\u2019t receive the recognition they should. Too often, it\u2019s out of sight, out of mind. If we don\u2019t talk about it, people won\u2019t ever get engaged enough to do something about it.\u201d","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"The inspirational true story of Brian Banks (Aldis Hodge), an All-American high school football star with a full scholarship to USC who finds his life upended when he is wrongly convicted of a crime he didn\u2019t commit. Despite a lack of evidence, Banks is railroaded through a broken justice system and sentenced to a decade of prison and probation.","post_date":"2nd December 2021, 00:09:11","french_date":"2 d\u00e9cembre 2021, 00:09:11","post_date_gmt":"2021-12-02 05:09:11","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10834","title":"seedprod","content":"","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"2nd December 2021, 00:06:52","french_date":"2 d\u00e9cembre 2021, 00:06:52","post_date_gmt":"2021-12-02 05:06:52","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10832","title":"gadgetine-theme","content":"","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"9th September 2019, 16:47:24","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 16:47:24","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 20:47:24","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10829","title":"gadgetine-theme","content":"","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"9th September 2019, 16:45:24","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 16:45:24","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 20:45:24","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10830","title":"gadgetine-theme","content":"html {\n\toverflow: hidden;\n\t\n}","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"9th September 2019, 16:45:24","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 16:45:24","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 20:45:24","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10827","title":"The Fighter","content":"The Fighter is a 2010 biographical sports film directed by David O. Russell, and starring\u00a0Mark Wahlberg and Christian Bale. The film centers on the life of professional boxer \"Irish\" Micky Ward (Wahlberg) and his older half-brother Dicky Eklund (Bale). Amy Adams co-stars as a love interest of Ward. The Fighter is Russell and Wahlberg's third film collaboration, following Three Kings and I Heart Huckabees.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nAs a welterweight from the wrong side of the tracks, Irish-American Dicky Eklund is the pride of working class Lowell, Massachusetts. Living in his shadow is his half-brother and sparring partner Micky Ward. After fighting Sugar Ray Leonard, Eklund plunges into a nightmare of crack addiction, violence and prison. His family's hopes are crushed in the wake of Dicky's decline. Like a real life Rocky, Micky fights on his own terms and pulls his family out of despair with his meteoric rise in the ring. Freshly paroled Dicky finds redemption training his little brother, now known as \"Irish\" Micky Ward, for his Welterweight Championship bout with Shea Neary.\r\n\r\nScout Productions acquired the life rights of boxer Micky Ward and his brother, Dick Eklund in July 2003. Eric Johnson and Paul Tamasy were also hired to write the screenplay, which was rewritten by Lewis Collick.\u00a0Mark Wahlberg joined the production in early 2005, with the intention of doing Ward's life story justice. Paramount Pictures, the United States distributor of the film, hired Paul Attanasio to rewrite Collick's draft in February 2007 in an attempt to emphasize the themes of brotherhood and redemption. Hoping to start production in Massachusetts in June 2007,\u00a0Mark Wahlberg had Martin Scorsese read the screenplay, hoping he would direct. Scorsese turned down the offer, finding the Massachusetts-setting redundant after having finished The Departed. The actor cited Scorsese's Raging Bull as an influence for The Fighter, but Scorsese was not interested in directing another boxing film. Darren Aronofsky was hired to direct in March 2007, with Scott Silver rewriting the script in September 2007.\r\n\r\nProduction proceeded with filming set to begin October 2008 and Christian Bale replacing Brad Pitt. By then Aronofsky had dropped out to work on MGM's aborted RoboCop remake, followed by Black Swan. Wahlberg and Bale chose\u00a0David O. Russell as Aronofsky's replacement. Wahlberg had also starred in Russell's Three Kings and I Heart Huckabees. Aronofsky was given an executive producer credit for his contributions on The Fighter, and was enthusiastic to have\u00a0David O. Russell as the director. In April 2009, Relativity Media stepped up to entirely finance the film, selling the international distribution rights to The Weinstein Company a month later. The Fighter began principal photography on July 13, 2009, on an $11 million budget in a 33-day shooting schedule.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"The Fighter is a 2010 biographical sports film directed by David O. Russell, and starring Mark Wahlberg and Christian Bale. The film centers on the life of professional boxer \"Irish\" Micky Ward (Wahlberg) and his older half-brother Dicky Eklund (Bale).","post_date":"9th September 2019, 16:18:48","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 16:18:48","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 20:18:48","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10826","title":"22 Jump Street","content":"After making their way through high school (twice), big changes are in store for officers Schmidt (Jonah Hill) and Jenko (Channing Tatum) when they go deep undercover at a local college.\u00a0But when Jenko meets a kindred spirit on the football team, and Schmidt infiltrates the bohemian art major scene, they begin to question their partnership.\u00a0 \r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nIn 2012, audiences around the world sparked to one of the year\u2019s funniest comedies with the hit film 21 Jump Street. Now, in 22 Jump Street, starring Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum, Peter Stormare, and Ice Cube. Directed by Phil Lord & Christopher Miller, the filmmakers take the relationship to the next level.\r\n\r\nIf the first film was about forming a relationship, the new film is about what it takes to make a relationship last. That idea dovetails nicely with the fact that the film is a sequel. Rather than approach 22 Jump Street by trying to re-create the magic \u2013 a re-tread of what came before \u2013 the filmmakers sought ways to keep it fresh\u2026 \u201cThe thing that struck us about movie sequels is that, in a way, they\u2019re like the second part of a relationship,\u201d says Lord.\r\n\r\nReturning to the role of Captain Dickson is Ice Cube. \u201cHe was my childhood hero,\u201d says Hill. \u201cWhen we worked on the first one, the first thing we wrote down was that Ice Cube \u2013 the guy who wrote \u2018F\u2014 Tha Police\u2019 \u2013 should play the police captain. It\u2019s a true childhood dream to be able to hang out with him.\u201d Cube relishes the role. \u201cI\u2019m the meanest, nastiest captain of them all,\u201d says Ice Cube.\r\n\r\nIn the role of Maya, who has a fling with Schmidt after the two connect at a poetry slam event at a campus coffeehouse, the filmmakers cast Amber Stevens. \u201cShe\u2019s attracted to Schmidt \u2013 she\u2019s intrigued by his chutzpah,\u201d says Stevens.\r\n\r\nProduction designer Steve Saklad says that Lord and Miller were clear in their direction: they wanted a realistic design into which they could drop the madness of Schmidt and Jenko.\u00a0 As a result, in creating the college environments, Saklad used sepia-toned images to create a history to the institution \u2013 and piled on the gags from there. In naming the on campus buildings, Saklad used names of fonts to create the fictitious Helvetica computer center, Bookman Memorial Library, Garamond Quad, and Clarendon Hall, all based on font names.\r\n\r\nFor the Jump Street unit headquarters, Saklad and his art department team located a neoclassical church in New Orleans that had been abandoned since Hurricane Katrina. After reinforcing and cleaning the building, they transformed it into the Vietnamese church.\r\n\r\nThe film\u2019s biggest set piece is the climax, which takes place in the fictional town of Puerto, Mexico.\u00a0 The sequence was filmed in Puerto Rico, with the beach party filmed on the sand as hundreds of extras danced to the beats of the world-renowned DJ Diplo.\r\n\r\n\u00a0","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Now, in 22 Jump Street, the filmmakers take the relationship to the next level. If the first film was about forming a relationship, the new film is about what it takes to make a relationship last. ","post_date":"9th September 2019, 15:57:49","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 15:57:49","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 19:57:49","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10825","title":"More Movie Details","content":"[vc_row][vc_column][vc_text_separator title=\"UPCOMING MOVIES\" i_icon_fontawesome=\"fa fa-film\" color=\"blue\" add_icon=\"true\"][\/vc_column][\/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][rev_slider_vc alias=\"upcoming\"][vc_text_separator title=\"IN THEATRES NOW\" i_icon_fontawesome=\"fa fa-slideshare\" i_background_style=\"rounded-less-outline\" i_size=\"lg\" color=\"orange\" add_icon=\"true\"][vc_basic_grid post_type=\"post\" max_items=\"12\" style=\"lazy\" items_per_page=\"15\" item=\"basicGrid_VerticalFlip\" grid_id=\"vc_gid:1568058522059-e155f484836acd6f73c1464a63a6f2c7-8\" taxonomies=\"3, 148, 63, 584, 84, 1943, 126, 168, 678\" exclude=\"10813, 10820\" offset=\"0\"][\/vc_column][\/vc_row]\n","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"9th September 2019, 15:50:07","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 15:50:07","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 19:50:07","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10820","title":"Abominable","content":"When teenage Yi (CHLOE BENNET, Marvel\u2019s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. TV series) stumbles upon a young Yeti on the roof of her apartment building, she and her friends, Jin (TENZING NORGAY TRAINOR, TV\u2019s Liv and Maddie), and his cousin, Peng (ALBERT TSAI, TV\u2019s Fresh Off the Boat), name him \u201cEverest\u201d and embark on an unforgettable quest to reunite the magical creature with his family at the highest point on Earth.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nFor Abominable writer\/director Jill Culton, the road to DreamWorks Animation has been a long and winding one. After she graduated from CalArts, she cut her teeth as an animator and storyboard artist at Pixar, where she collaborated on Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and A Bug\u2019s Life before helping to craft the story for Monster\u2019s, Inc. As well, she spent several years at Sony Animation, where she directed their first animated-feature film, Open Season. Culton had met with DreamWorks over the years to discuss various projects, but it was not until she was swept away at an early screening of How to Train Your Dragon that everything clicked into place and she decided to join the studio.\r\n\r\nOriental DreamWorks, the company that later became Pearl Studio, and DreamWorks Animation pitched Culton the idea for a \u201cYeti movie,\u201d and she took the seed of that idea back to her home in a small town nestled in the woods of Marin County in Northern California. There, surrounded by majestic redwoods, she began to imagine an epic tale of a young woman who finds herself at an unimaginable crossroads.\r\n\r\nThe massive contrast in size between the Yeti, Everest, and Yi was inspired by a very specific memory from Culton\u2019s childhood. \u201cWhen I was five or six, my neighbors had this giant London Great Dane that had to be almost 200 pounds,\u201d she says. \u201cI was always scared but intrigued; he outweighed me by more than double. One day, my friend Nancy and I were running around the house, and he started chasing us. I jumped off the stairs to avoid him, and I fell. This giant dog pinned me to the ground and was breathing in my face, staring into me; I was terrified but amazed at the same time. Since then, I\u2019ve only had big dogs. They\u2019re just this huge, fascinating presence in my world.\u201d\r\n\r\nIn bringing Abominable to life, Culton would find kindred spirits in producer Suzanne Buirgy, DreamWorks Animation\u2019s longtime champion of the production, and Peilin Chou, chief creative officer of Pearl Studio and our story\u2019s Yi writ large. Making history as the first trio of female filmmakers to bring a big-studio animated feature to the big screen, the collaborators did and do not take that historic designation lightly.\r\n\r\nWhen it comes to character creation and design, Culton takes her craft with the utmost seriousness. This work ethic and passion goes back to her first feature, Toy Story, when she was in her early 20s. \u201cA bunch of us from CalArts moved up to Northern California,\u201d Culton says. \u201cThis was the first computer-animated film, and Pixar wanted 12 animators to start on the same day; I was one of those. We had to learn UNIX, and every day, we\u2019d come in and software would be either broken or enhanced. It was so hard every day, and none of us knew at the time that CG was the way that the world was going.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe filmmaker\u2019s passion for inventive storytelling extended to the creation of one of that studio\u2019s most beloved characters, Jessie, from Toy Story 2. All her hard work proved worth it, not just on a creative level, but a humanitarian one. \u201cI\u2019ll never forget that after the film came out, letters started coming to the studio and they were posted on the wall,\u201d she continues. \u201cThey were, \u2018My kid fought cancer because he thought he was Buzz Lightyear and could go to infinity and beyond.\u2019 I realized the power of movies then. We give our lives to these things, and I knew I didn\u2019t want to ever be on a movie that was just sheer entertainment. They have to mean something.\u201d\r\n\r\nProducer Suzanne Buirgy acknowledges that none of this would have been possible without proprietary DreamWorks animation technology: \u201cThe software we\u2019ve secured is incredible,\u201d Buirgy says. \u201cThis combination of Premo, which is an amazing animation software, and MoonRay, a near-real-time rendering one, created wondrous animation renders that look incredible. It\u2019s stunning that we are able to have representative lighting in them, which allowed us to look at scenes early on versus waiting for lighting later.\u201d\r\n\r\nCo-director Todd Wilderman was wowed by just how quickly the software allowed the team to understand what final sequences would look like. \u201cUsing Premo, head of character animation John Hill and his team moved so fast with the animation,\u201d Wilderman says. \u201cThere are a lot of long shots and complex acting in this film. Back in the day, you didn\u2019t have full fur when you were animating. You almost had something slick that looked like the Michelin Man. To experience Everest actually having full fur that made him look exactly the way he does in the movie\u2026when we were just blocking out animation and approving performance? It was a dream. It allowed us to see the scene for what it was, make decisions quickly and approve animation much faster\u2014and know it wasn\u2019t a leap of faith. What we were seeing was what was going to get rendered and lit. Suddenly, he is in full costume. Same with the kids; they had full-on hair and weren\u2019t just geometric shapes.\u201d\r\n\r\nIt was crucial to the production that the film accurately highlight Chinese landscapes and culture, from the glistening buildings of the big city to the countryside, with beauty, artistry and precision. That process was divided equally between DreamWorks Animation in America and Pearl Studio in China. Production designer Max Boas would work with the team at Pearl Studio on specific design elements\u2014like Yi\u2019s apartment and bedroom\u2014and together, the teams would go to painstaking lengths to make it as realistic as possible. Boas and his team in Glendale, California, sought out the input and feedback from the team at Pearl throughout the course of production. This unique East\/West creative collaboration between the two partner studios brought a vibrant China to life through animation as it has never been captured before on the big screen.","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/09\/abobinable-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/09\/abobinable-1024x576.jpg","post_excerpt":"DreamWorks Animation and Pearl Studio present Abominable, starring Chloe Bennet, Tenzing Norgay Trainor, Albert Tsai, Eddie Izzard, Sarah Paulson, Tsai Chin, Michelle Wong. Music for the film is by Rupert Gregson-Williams. The film is co-produced by Rebecca Huntley. ","post_date":"9th September 2019, 15:46:21","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 15:46:21","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 19:46:21","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10824","title":"Abominable","content":"When teenage Yi (CHLOE BENNET, Marvel\u2019s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. TV series) stumbles upon a young Yeti on the roof of her apartment building, she and her friends, Jin (TENZING NORGAY TRAINOR, TV\u2019s Liv and Maddie), and his cousin, Peng (ALBERT TSAI, TV\u2019s Fresh Off the Boat), name him \u201cEverest\u201d and embark on an unforgettable quest to reunite the magical creature with his family at the highest point on Earth.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nFor Abominable writer\/director Jill Culton, the road to DreamWorks Animation has been a long and winding one. After she graduated from CalArts, she cut her teeth as an animator and storyboard artist at Pixar, where she collaborated on Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and A Bug\u2019s Life before helping to craft the story for Monster\u2019s, Inc. As well, she spent several years at Sony Animation, where she directed their first animated-feature film, Open Season. Culton had met with DreamWorks over the years to discuss various projects, but it was not until she was swept away at an early screening of How to Train Your Dragon that everything clicked into place and she decided to join the studio.\r\n\r\nOriental DreamWorks, the company that later became Pearl Studio, and DreamWorks Animation pitched Culton the idea for a \u201cYeti movie,\u201d and she took the seed of that idea back to her home in a small town nestled in the woods of Marin County in Northern California. There, surrounded by majestic redwoods, she began to imagine an epic tale of a young woman who finds herself at an unimaginable crossroads.\r\n\r\nThe massive contrast in size between the Yeti, Everest, and Yi was inspired by a very specific memory from Culton\u2019s childhood. \u201cWhen I was five or six, my neighbors had this giant London Great Dane that had to be almost 200 pounds,\u201d she says. \u201cI was always scared but intrigued; he outweighed me by more than double. One day, my friend Nancy and I were running around the house, and he started chasing us. I jumped off the stairs to avoid him, and I fell. This giant dog pinned me to the ground and was breathing in my face, staring into me; I was terrified but amazed at the same time. Since then, I\u2019ve only had big dogs. They\u2019re just this huge, fascinating presence in my world.\u201d\r\n\r\nIn bringing Abominable to life, Culton would find kindred spirits in producer Suzanne Buirgy, DreamWorks Animation\u2019s longtime champion of the production, and Peilin Chou, chief creative officer of Pearl Studio and our story\u2019s Yi writ large. Making history as the first trio of female filmmakers to bring a big-studio animated feature to the big screen, the collaborators did and do not take that historic designation lightly.\r\n\r\nWhen it comes to character creation and design, Culton takes her craft with the utmost seriousness. This work ethic and passion goes back to her first feature, Toy Story, when she was in her early 20s. \u201cA bunch of us from CalArts moved up to Northern California,\u201d Culton says. \u201cThis was the first computer-animated film, and Pixar wanted 12 animators to start on the same day; I was one of those. We had to learn UNIX, and every day, we\u2019d come in and software would be either broken or enhanced. It was so hard every day, and none of us knew at the time that CG was the way that the world was going.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe filmmaker\u2019s passion for inventive storytelling extended to the creation of one of that studio\u2019s most beloved characters, Jessie, from Toy Story 2. All her hard work proved worth it, not just on a creative level, but a humanitarian one. \u201cI\u2019ll never forget that after the film came out, letters started coming to the studio and they were posted on the wall,\u201d she continues. \u201cThey were, \u2018My kid fought cancer because he thought he was Buzz Lightyear and could go to infinity and beyond.\u2019 I realized the power of movies then. We give our lives to these things, and I knew I didn\u2019t want to ever be on a movie that was just sheer entertainment. They have to mean something.\u201d\r\n\r\nProducer Suzanne Buirgy acknowledges that none of this would have been possible without proprietary DreamWorks animation technology: \u201cThe software we\u2019ve secured is incredible,\u201d Buirgy says. \u201cThis combination of Premo, which is an amazing animation software, and MoonRay, a near-real-time rendering one, created wondrous animation renders that look incredible. It\u2019s stunning that we are able to have representative lighting in them, which allowed us to look at scenes early on versus waiting for lighting later.\u201d\r\n\r\nCo-director Todd Wilderman was wowed by just how quickly the software allowed the team to understand what final sequences would look like. \u201cUsing Premo, head of character animation John Hill and his team moved so fast with the animation,\u201d Wilderman says. \u201cThere are a lot of long shots and complex acting in this film. Back in the day, you didn\u2019t have full fur when you were animating. You almost had something slick that looked like the Michelin Man. To experience Everest actually having full fur that made him look exactly the way he does in the movie\u2026when we were just blocking out animation and approving performance? It was a dream. It allowed us to see the scene for what it was, make decisions quickly and approve animation much faster\u2014and know it wasn\u2019t a leap of faith. What we were seeing was what was going to get rendered and lit. Suddenly, he is in full costume. Same with the kids; they had full-on hair and weren\u2019t just geometric shapes.\u201d\r\n\r\nIt was crucial to the production that the film accurately highlight Chinese landscapes and culture, from the glistening buildings of the big city to the countryside, with beauty, artistry and precision. That process was divided equally between DreamWorks Animation in America and Pearl Studio in China. Production designer Max Boas would work with the team at Pearl Studio on specific design elements\u2014like Yi\u2019s apartment and bedroom\u2014and together, the teams would go to painstaking lengths to make it as realistic as possible. Boas and his team in Glendale, California, sought out the input and feedback from the team at Pearl throughout the course of production. This unique East\/West creative collaboration between the two partner studios brought a vibrant China to life through animation as it has never been captured before on the big screen.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"DreamWorks Animation and Pearl Studio present Abominable, starring Chloe Bennet, Tenzing Norgay Trainor, Albert Tsai, Eddie Izzard, Sarah Paulson, Tsai Chin, Michelle Wong. Music for the film is by Rupert Gregson-Williams. The film is co-produced by Rebecca Huntley. ","post_date":"9th September 2019, 15:46:21","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 15:46:21","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 19:46:21","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10823","title":"Abominable","content":"When teenage Yi (CHLOE BENNET, Marvel\u2019s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. TV series) stumbles upon a young Yeti on the roof of her apartment building, she and her friends, Jin (TENZING NORGAY TRAINOR, TV\u2019s Liv and Maddie), and his cousin, Peng (ALBERT TSAI, TV\u2019s Fresh Off the Boat), name him \u201cEverest\u201d and embark on an unforgettable quest to reunite the magical creature with his family at the highest point on Earth.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nFor Abominable writer\/director Jill Culton, the road to DreamWorks Animation has been a long and winding one. After she graduated from CalArts, she cut her teeth as an animator and storyboard artist at Pixar, where she collaborated on Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and A Bug\u2019s Life before helping to craft the story for Monster\u2019s, Inc. As well, she spent several years at Sony Animation, where she directed their first animated-feature film, Open Season. Culton had met with DreamWorks over the years to discuss various projects, but it was not until she was swept away at an early screening of How to Train Your Dragon that everything clicked into place and she decided to join the studio.\r\n\r\nOriental DreamWorks, the company that later became Pearl Studio, and DreamWorks Animation pitched Culton the idea for a \u201cYeti movie,\u201d and she took the seed of that idea back to her home in a small town nestled in the woods of Marin County in Northern California. There, surrounded by majestic redwoods, she began to imagine an epic tale of a young woman who finds herself at an unimaginable crossroads.\r\n\r\nThe massive contrast in size between the Yeti, Everest, and Yi was inspired by a very specific memory from Culton\u2019s childhood. \u201cWhen I was five or six, my neighbors had this giant London Great Dane that had to be almost 200 pounds,\u201d she says. \u201cI was always scared but intrigued; he outweighed me by more than double. One day, my friend Nancy and I were running around the house, and he started chasing us. I jumped off the stairs to avoid him, and I fell. This giant dog pinned me to the ground and was breathing in my face, staring into me; I was terrified but amazed at the same time. Since then, I\u2019ve only had big dogs. They\u2019re just this huge, fascinating presence in my world.\u201d\r\n\r\nIn bringing Abominable to life, Culton would find kindred spirits in producer Suzanne Buirgy, DreamWorks Animation\u2019s longtime champion of the production, and Peilin Chou, chief creative officer of Pearl Studio and our story\u2019s Yi writ large. Making history as the first trio of female filmmakers to bring a big-studio animated feature to the big screen, the collaborators did and do not take that historic designation lightly.\r\n\r\nWhen it comes to character creation and design, Culton takes her craft with the utmost seriousness. This work ethic and passion goes back to her first feature, Toy Story, when she was in her early 20s. \u201cA bunch of us from CalArts moved up to Northern California,\u201d Culton says. \u201cThis was the first computer-animated film, and Pixar wanted 12 animators to start on the same day; I was one of those. We had to learn UNIX, and every day, we\u2019d come in and software would be either broken or enhanced. It was so hard every day, and none of us knew at the time that CG was the way that the world was going.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe filmmaker\u2019s passion for inventive storytelling extended to the creation of one of that studio\u2019s most beloved characters, Jessie, from Toy Story 2. All her hard work proved worth it, not just on a creative level, but a humanitarian one. \u201cI\u2019ll never forget that after the film came out, letters started coming to the studio and they were posted on the wall,\u201d she continues. \u201cThey were, \u2018My kid fought cancer because he thought he was Buzz Lightyear and could go to infinity and beyond.\u2019 I realized the power of movies then. We give our lives to these things, and I knew I didn\u2019t want to ever be on a movie that was just sheer entertainment. They have to mean something.\u201d\r\n\r\nProducer Suzanne Buirgy acknowledges that none of this would have been possible without proprietary DreamWorks animation technology: \u201cThe software we\u2019ve secured is incredible,\u201d Buirgy says. \u201cThis combination of Premo, which is an amazing animation software, and MoonRay, a near-real-time rendering one, created wondrous animation renders that look incredible. It\u2019s stunning that we are able to have representative lighting in them, which allowed us to look at scenes early on versus waiting for lighting later.\u201d\r\n\r\nCo-director Todd Wilderman was wowed by just how quickly the software allowed the team to understand what final sequences would look like. \u201cUsing Premo, head of character animation John Hill and his team moved so fast with the animation,\u201d Wilderman says. \u201cThere are a lot of long shots and complex acting in this film. Back in the day, you didn\u2019t have full fur when you were animating. You almost had something slick that looked like the Michelin Man. To experience Everest actually having full fur that made him look exactly the way he does in the movie\u2026when we were just blocking out animation and approving performance? It was a dream. It allowed us to see the scene for what it was, make decisions quickly and approve animation much faster\u2014and know it wasn\u2019t a leap of faith. What we were seeing was what was going to get rendered and lit. Suddenly, he is in full costume. Same with the kids; they had full-on hair and weren\u2019t just geometric shapes.\u201d\r\n\r\nIt was crucial to the production that the film accurately highlight Chinese landscapes and culture, from the glistening buildings of the big city to the countryside, with beauty, artistry and precision. That process was divided equally between DreamWorks Animation in America and Pearl Studio in China. Production designer Max Boas would work with the team at Pearl Studio on specific design elements\u2014like Yi\u2019s apartment and bedroom\u2014and together, the teams would go to painstaking lengths to make it as realistic as possible. Boas and his team in Glendale, California, sought out the input and feedback from the team at Pearl throughout the course of production. This unique East\/West creative collaboration between the two partner studios brought a vibrant China to life through animation as it has never been captured before on the big screen.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"9th September 2019, 15:39:37","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 15:39:37","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 19:39:37","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10822","title":"Abominable movie poster","content":"In Abominable, the city skyline is filled with details typical of a modern Chinese metropolis. Signs dotting the skyline advertise tea shops, popular international supermarkets (with imported goods), Huazhu Hotel (one of China\u2019s largest hotel brands), authentic specialty food restaurants, and even McDonald\u2019s. (Fun fact: China reportedly has the third most McDonald\u2019s restaurants in the world\u2014after only the U.S. and Japan.)","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/09\/abominable-movie-poster-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/09\/abominable-movie-poster.jpg","post_excerpt":"In Abominable, the city skyline is filled with details typical of a modern Chinese metropolis. Signs dotting the skyline advertise tea shops, popular international supermarkets (with imported goods), Huazhu Hotel (one of China\u2019s largest hotel brands), authentic specialty food restaurants, and even McDonald\u2019s. (Fun fact: China reportedly has the third most McDonald\u2019s restaurants in the world\u2014after only the U.S. and Japan.)","post_date":"9th September 2019, 15:38:19","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 15:38:19","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 19:38:19","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10821","title":"abobinable","content":"","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/09\/abobinable-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/09\/abobinable-1024x576.jpg","post_excerpt":"","post_date":"9th September 2019, 15:38:06","french_date":"9 septembre 2019, 15:38:06","post_date_gmt":"2019-09-09 19:38:06","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10818","title":"The Sacrament","content":"From acclaimed writer\/director Ti West and master of horror Eli Roth, The Sacrament follows two Vice Media correspondents as they set out to document their friend\u2019s journey to find his missing sister. They travel outside of the United States to an undisclosed location where they are welcomed into the world of \u201cEden Parish,\u201d a self-sustained rural utopia, comprised of nearly two hundred members.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThe Sacrament\u00a0stars Joe Swanberg, AJ Bowen, Kentucker Audley, Amy Seimetz, and Gene Jones. The film is written, directed and edited by Ti West and produced by Eli Roth, Jacob Jaffke, Peter Phok, Christopher Woodrow, Molly Conners and Eric Newman.\r\n\r\nQ&A WITH WRITER \/ DIRECTOR TI WEST \r\n\r\n[accordion][acc title=\"Tell us about the concept and story behind THE SACRAMENT. How did the idea come to you?\"]I had always wanted to make a mini-series inspired by Jonestown but felt it would either never happen or take far too long to come to fruition, and being as impatient as I am, I decided to find a way to rework that story into something more likely to get made. We are living in a somewhat unstable time, and a lot of the reasons people joined The People\u2019s Temple in the 60\u2019s and 70\u2019s seem very relevant today. In updating the story to a modern era, I felt that VICE would be most appropriate as the media outlet where the main characters work. VICE has been responsible for some of the most interesting and provocative content in recent years, and they take a lot of risks for their stories. It was a perfect fit.[\/acc][acc title=\"Why did you decide to structure this project as a documentary style film?\"]I actually consider \u201cdocumentary-style\u201d a type of \u201cnew-media\u201d cinema. I used VICE\u2019s documentary style as a structural model, but really tried to have the story, cinematography and soundtrack transcend familiar genre labels. Hopefully it feels not like \u201cfound footage,\u201d but rather like something \u201cnew.\u201d[\/acc][acc title=\"Talk about the casting process.\"]One of the great things about this project was that I had total control over casting. Most of the roles were written specifically for certain actors I had in mind, all of whom I ended up with. In my opinion, casting is 75% of directing, and when you are able to get the right people for the roles, it not only makes the job easier, it makes for a more authentic film.[\/acc][acc title=\"Have you worked with any cast members of the production previously?\"]I had worked with almost all of them in some form or another over the years, but this was the first time I was able to get everyone together all at once, the exception being Gene Jones, who I had never met or worked with. Suffice it to say; when he showed up to set on his first day, we were all blown away by his performance.[\/acc][acc title=\"How was it shooting in Savannah, GA?\"]Savannah was very welcoming. We originally intended to shoot near Charleston, South Carolina, but after starting pre-production, the state decided the content of our film was not worthy of their tax dollars and disqualified us from being able to use their tax credit. While that was incredibly frustrating at first, it was probably a blessing in disguise because moving down to Savannah ended up benefitting the production. What is most impressive is that we built the entire foreign community of \u201cEden Parish\u201d in someone\u2019s backyard in Georgia.[\/acc][\/accordion]","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"The Sacrament is a American found footage horror thriller film directed by Ti West. The movie's plot takes several elements from real life events such as the Jonestown Massacre of 1978.","post_date":"29th August 2019, 14:54:08","french_date":"29 ao\u00fbt 2019, 14:54:08","post_date_gmt":"2019-08-29 18:54:08","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10817","title":"More Movie Details","content":"[vc_row][vc_column][vc_text_separator title=\"UPCOMING MOVIES\" i_icon_fontawesome=\"fa fa-film\" color=\"blue\" add_icon=\"true\"][\/vc_column][\/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][rev_slider_vc alias=\"upcoming\"][vc_text_separator title=\"IN THEATRES NOW\" i_icon_fontawesome=\"fa fa-slideshare\" i_background_style=\"rounded-less-outline\" i_size=\"lg\" color=\"orange\" add_icon=\"true\"][vc_basic_grid post_type=\"post\" max_items=\"12\" style=\"lazy\" items_per_page=\"15\" item=\"basicGrid_VerticalFlip\" grid_id=\"vc_gid:1567104271628-c7eaddb404489dee892e8b3cf4c29bb6-7\" taxonomies=\"3, 148, 63, 584, 84, 1943, 126, 168, 678\" exclude=\"10813\" offset=\"0\"][\/vc_column][\/vc_row]\n","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"","post_date":"29th August 2019, 14:45:48","french_date":"29 ao\u00fbt 2019, 14:45:48","post_date_gmt":"2019-08-29 18:45:48","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10813","title":"Hustlers","content":"Inspired by true events, HUSTLERS is a comedy-drama that follows a crew of savvy strip club employees who band together to turn the tables on their Wall Street clients. At the start of 2007, Destiny (Constance Wu) is a young woman struggling to make ends meet, to provide for herself and her grandma. But it\u2019s not easy: the managers, DJs, and bartenders expect a cut\u2013 one way or another \u2013 leaving Destiny with a meager payday after a long night of stripping.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nJennifer Lopez, who portrays Ramona and serves as a producer on the film, says she was drawn to the fact that HUSTLERS is about \u201cgreed, power, and the American Dream and what a certain group of women, who work in a field where they are discounted, will do to achieve it. It\u2019s an amorality story about the slippery slope of the hustle. These women did not invent the game; they just tried to level the playing field. It\u2019s about right, wrong, and how far you\u2019ll go to hustle for your dreams.\u201d\r\n\r\nAccording to producer Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas, the filmmakers sought an inclusive cast, which \u201clends itself authentically to the world, while also being a lot of fun.\u201d All the actors, like their on-screen counterparts, bonded instantly, and understood but didn\u2019t judge their characters. \u201cThey really inhabited them,\u201d Goldsmith-Thomas continues. \u201cThey understood who these women were and what it meant to be an exotic dancer. HUSTLERS is a celebration of sisterhood, and what a tight-knit family of women have to do for a fighting chance.\u201d\r\n\r\nConstance Wu was especially intrigued with the relationship between her character, Destiny, and Jennifer Lopez\u2019s Ramona, and likens it to a pairing in one of her favorite novels. \u201cWhat Ramona is for Destiny reminds me of this quote from Patricia Highsmith\u2019s The Talented Mr. Ripley: \u2018The thing with Dickie... it's like the sun shines on you, and it's glorious. And then he forgets you and it's very, very cold...When you have his attention, you feel like you're the only person in the world, that's why everybody loves him so much.\u2019 Destiny's dream come true is for Ramona to love her.\u201d Wu did extensive research for the role, the most important of which, she notes, was \u201cbecoming close with different women in the profession and getting to know them as people.\u201d\r\n\r\nLike Wu, Lopez got to know several dancers and visited strip clubs, where she observed their routines. \u201cI then met with them backstage and listened to what it was like to have a career as a dancer,\u201d Lopez recalls. \u201cI soaked up the atmosphere and wanted to learn how to do things authentically, including pole dancing. I think it would surprise people \u2013 although it shouldn\u2019t \u2013 that most of these women are just trying to get by. Their struggles are 100 percent relatable. They want to take care of themselves and their families, and we wanted to make sure we brought that all to life.\u201d\r\n\r\nTrace Lysette portrays the dancer, Tracey. Lysette, who became one of the first trans actors to appear on a prime-time television series in a speaking role, with her work on Transparent, actually made a living at a strip club. \u201cI danced at [the popular New York strip club] Scores for over eight years,\u201d she explains. \u201cI remember when the money was flowing \u2013 and when it stopped coming after the 2008 financial crisis.\u201d\r\n\r\nThere were many challenges awaiting the actors who portray the exotic dancers, but certainly learning their way around a strip club pole was at the top of the list. \u201cMy muscles have never been so sore as when I trained on that pole,\u201d Wu succinctly describes her experiences while training to learn the precise and specific moves. Even Lopez, a longtime skilled dancer who works out every day, says it was one of the most difficult things she\u2019s ever done. \u201cI trained for almost six months in preparation for this film,\u201d she relates. \u201cI had a portable strip pole in every city I visited, so I never missed a session. I was using a group of muscles I hadn\u2019t ever tested before, so I walked away with fresh bruises after every session. My shoulders and back are still recovering!\u201d\r\n\r\nWu, Lopez and all the actors required to learn pole dancing, credit pole choreographer Johanna Sapakie with making it all possible for them. \u201cJohanna is really talented,\u201d says Lopez, \u201cand we couldn\u2019t have done it without her expert guidance.\u201d A former Cirque de Soleil performer and acrobatic dancer, Sapakie says it was important that each actor be able to feel what it\u2019s like to be dancing on a pole. \u201cIt\u2019s their environment, and part of their characters\u2019 development,\u201d she says.\r\n\r\nResearch was a key tool in shaping Muskey\u2019s designs. \u201cI looked at the social media accounts of some strippers, and was so impressed,\u201d veteran production designer Jane Musky (Maid in Manhattan) recalls. \u201cThere were images of their knees bleeding; their work is very demanding and strenuous, but they make it look so beautiful.\u201d While realism was the watchword, \u201cWe did make some changes,\u201d Muskey says. \u201cUsually, a club\u2019s dressing rooms lockers store all the dancers\u2019 belongings. But we wanted to see them prepare to go on stage, with all their makeup, garments, and grooming tools filling up the frame.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe scenes set in the gentlemen\u2019s club were captured at an actual New York strip club, Show Palace, which Muskey and her team made their own. \u201cIt was important that we create a look, so we transformed that venue,\u201d she explains. \u201cWe made it more visually dynamic, with reflections, color, and neon \u2013 giving it a little more life.\u201d The club\u2019s owner was so pleased with the changes, that he retained them after filming had wrapped at the site.\r\n\r\nCostume designer Mitchell Travers also got a kick out of designing for some of the notables from the world of music, who play supporting roles. \u201cI really loved working in a different light with globally recognized figures, like Cardi B and Lizzo,\u201d he offers. \u201cI would think about details like what goes in their purses, how big are the purses, and do they take the subway or travel by taxi?\u201d\r\n\r\n\u00a0","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/08\/hustlers-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/08\/hustlers-1024x576.jpg","post_excerpt":"HUSTLERS brings together a compelling mix of humor, spectacle, social commentary, and a group of disparate women who team up and look for ways to even the odds that are stacked against them.","post_date":"29th August 2019, 14:39:33","french_date":"29 ao\u00fbt 2019, 14:39:33","post_date_gmt":"2019-08-29 18:39:33","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10816","title":"Hustlers","content":"Inspired by true events, HUSTLERS is a comedy-drama that follows a crew of savvy strip club employees who band together to turn the tables on their Wall Street clients. At the start of 2007, Destiny (Constance Wu) is a young woman struggling to make ends meet, to provide for herself and her grandma. But it\u2019s not easy: the managers, DJs, and bartenders expect a cut\u2013 one way or another \u2013 leaving Destiny with a meager payday after a long night of stripping.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nJennifer Lopez, who portrays Ramona and serves as a producer on the film, says she was drawn to the fact that HUSTLERS is about \u201cgreed, power, and the American Dream and what a certain group of women, who work in a field where they are discounted, will do to achieve it. It\u2019s an amorality story about the slippery slope of the hustle. These women did not invent the game; they just tried to level the playing field. It\u2019s about right, wrong, and how far you\u2019ll go to hustle for your dreams.\u201d\r\n\r\nAccording to producer Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas, the filmmakers sought an inclusive cast, which \u201clends itself authentically to the world, while also being a lot of fun.\u201d All the actors, like their on-screen counterparts, bonded instantly, and understood but didn\u2019t judge their characters. \u201cThey really inhabited them,\u201d Goldsmith-Thomas continues. \u201cThey understood who these women were and what it meant to be an exotic dancer. HUSTLERS is a celebration of sisterhood, and what a tight-knit family of women have to do for a fighting chance.\u201d\r\n\r\nConstance Wu was especially intrigued with the relationship between her character, Destiny, and Jennifer Lopez\u2019s Ramona, and likens it to a pairing in one of her favorite novels. \u201cWhat Ramona is for Destiny reminds me of this quote from Patricia Highsmith\u2019s The Talented Mr. Ripley: \u2018The thing with Dickie... it's like the sun shines on you, and it's glorious. And then he forgets you and it's very, very cold...When you have his attention, you feel like you're the only person in the world, that's why everybody loves him so much.\u2019 Destiny's dream come true is for Ramona to love her.\u201d Wu did extensive research for the role, the most important of which, she notes, was \u201cbecoming close with different women in the profession and getting to know them as people.\u201d\r\n\r\nLike Wu, Lopez got to know several dancers and visited strip clubs, where she observed their routines. \u201cI then met with them backstage and listened to what it was like to have a career as a dancer,\u201d Lopez recalls. \u201cI soaked up the atmosphere and wanted to learn how to do things authentically, including pole dancing. I think it would surprise people \u2013 although it shouldn\u2019t \u2013 that most of these women are just trying to get by. Their struggles are 100 percent relatable. They want to take care of themselves and their families, and we wanted to make sure we brought that all to life.\u201d\r\n\r\nTrace Lysette portrays the dancer, Tracey. Lysette, who became one of the first trans actors to appear on a prime-time television series in a speaking role, with her work on Transparent, actually made a living at a strip club. \u201cI danced at [the popular New York strip club] Scores for over eight years,\u201d she explains. \u201cI remember when the money was flowing \u2013 and when it stopped coming after the 2008 financial crisis.\u201d\r\n\r\nThere were many challenges awaiting the actors who portray the exotic dancers, but certainly learning their way around a strip club pole was at the top of the list. \u201cMy muscles have never been so sore as when I trained on that pole,\u201d Wu succinctly describes her experiences while training to learn the precise and specific moves. Even Lopez, a longtime skilled dancer who works out every day, says it was one of the most difficult things she\u2019s ever done. \u201cI trained for almost six months in preparation for this film,\u201d she relates. \u201cI had a portable strip pole in every city I visited, so I never missed a session. I was using a group of muscles I hadn\u2019t ever tested before, so I walked away with fresh bruises after every session. My shoulders and back are still recovering!\u201d\r\n\r\nWu, Lopez and all the actors required to learn pole dancing, credit pole choreographer Johanna Sapakie with making it all possible for them. \u201cJohanna is really talented,\u201d says Lopez, \u201cand we couldn\u2019t have done it without her expert guidance.\u201d A former Cirque de Soleil performer and acrobatic dancer, Sapakie says it was important that each actor be able to feel what it\u2019s like to be dancing on a pole. \u201cIt\u2019s their environment, and part of their characters\u2019 development,\u201d she says.\r\n\r\nResearch was a key tool in shaping Muskey\u2019s designs. \u201cI looked at the social media accounts of some strippers, and was so impressed,\u201d veteran production designer Jane Musky (Maid in Manhattan) recalls. \u201cThere were images of their knees bleeding; their work is very demanding and strenuous, but they make it look so beautiful.\u201d While realism was the watchword, \u201cWe did make some changes,\u201d Muskey says. \u201cUsually, a club\u2019s dressing rooms lockers store all the dancers\u2019 belongings. But we wanted to see them prepare to go on stage, with all their makeup, garments, and grooming tools filling up the frame.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe scenes set in the gentlemen\u2019s club were captured at an actual New York strip club, Show Palace, which Muskey and her team made their own. \u201cIt was important that we create a look, so we transformed that venue,\u201d she explains. \u201cWe made it more visually dynamic, with reflections, color, and neon \u2013 giving it a little more life.\u201d The club\u2019s owner was so pleased with the changes, that he retained them after filming had wrapped at the site.\r\n\r\nCostume designer Mitchell Travers also got a kick out of designing for some of the notables from the world of music, who play supporting roles. \u201cI really loved working in a different light with globally recognized figures, like Cardi B and Lizzo,\u201d he offers. \u201cI would think about details like what goes in their purses, how big are the purses, and do they take the subway or travel by taxi?\u201d\r\n\r\n\u00a0","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"HUSTLERS brings together a compelling mix of humor, spectacle, social commentary, and a group of disparate women who team up and look for ways to even the odds that are stacked against them.","post_date":"29th August 2019, 14:39:33","french_date":"29 ao\u00fbt 2019, 14:39:33","post_date_gmt":"2019-08-29 18:39:33","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10815","title":"hustlers movie","content":"","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/08\/hustlers-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/08\/hustlers-1024x576.jpg","post_excerpt":"","post_date":"29th August 2019, 14:36:17","french_date":"29 ao\u00fbt 2019, 14:36:17","post_date_gmt":"2019-08-29 18:36:17","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10814","title":"Hustlers","content":"Producer Jessica Elbaum, a principal at Gloria Sanchez Productions, which optioned Pressler\u2019s New York magazine story, observes, \u201cI found these women\u2019s journeys to be fascinating. It\u2019s a slice of life and a cautionary tale about what happens when your ambition is bigger than the reality of your situation.\u201d","post_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/08\/hustlers-movie-poster-150x150.jpg","big_image":"https:\/\/moremoviedetails.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2019\/08\/hustlers-movie-poster.jpg","post_excerpt":"Producer Jessica Elbaum, a principal at Gloria Sanchez Productions, which optioned Pressler\u2019s New York magazine story, observes, \u201cI found these women\u2019s journeys to be fascinating. It\u2019s a slice of life and a cautionary tale about what happens when your ambition is bigger than the reality of your situation.\u201d","post_date":"29th August 2019, 14:35:27","french_date":"29 ao\u00fbt 2019, 14:35:27","post_date_gmt":"2019-08-29 18:35:27","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"},{"id":"10811","title":"Filth","content":"Filmmaker Jon S. Baird felt a very personal connection to the world of FILTH from the moment he picked up the book. Irvine Welsh\u2019s much-loved novel recounts the story of not only one of the most iconic, foul-mouthed, irate and downright hilarious policemen in modern fiction, but also one of the most tragic.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nFor writer-director Baird, who made his name with his acclaimed directorial debut Cass, it was the decline in Bruce\u2019s mental wellbeing that resonated most of all. \u201cI scripted Bruce in a particular way because I grew up with someone who had bipolar disorder\u201d Baird explains. The film rights had resided with another production company, though reverted to Welsh, \u201cand when Irvine and I spoke again in August 2008, the book option had become available,\u201d the writer-director adds. Baird and producer Ken Marshall then travelled to Welsh\u2019s home to finalize the deal.\r\n\r\nOnce the book was optioned the producer-director team had a very clear vision for their adaptation, which Baird would bring to life with the screenplay. \u201cI think previous attempts at an adaptation had tried to do it as a quite literal translation, in terms of it being really dark and gritty, more like a thriller and more of a social realism approach\u201d says Baird. \u201cBut, while the story is a tragedy and has an extremely tragic central character, I thought the book\u2019s black humor was the key to unlocking a more cinematic adaptation.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe central character in FILTH is one of the most memorable in modern British fiction. Detective Sergeant Bruce Robertson introduces himself as an unashamed emotional hardnut and the master of most of what he surveys. To cast the right Bruce Robertson the filmmakers turned to acclaimed Scottish actor James McAvoy, best known for the likes of The Last King of Scotland, Atonement, Wanted, X-Men: First Class and Trance.\r\n\r\nAs much as he liked the script, McAvoy says that he wanted to make sure that the filmmakers had chosen him \u201cfor the right reasons.\u201d He notes, \u201cSometimes filmmakers want you just because they think you can help get things financed.\u201d McAvoy is certainly a name that inspires financiers but the actor says that he trusted Baird and Marshall\u2019s integrity.\r\n\r\nThe whole story unfolds in Edinburgh, with a small section in Germany, the filmmakers shooting in Stirling, Glasgow, Belgium, Hamburg and in Trollh\u00e4ttan in Sweden, as well as Scotland\u2019s capital, though Baird believes that, \u201cThe locations and time period could be anywhere. The setting is not vital to the story we wanted to tell.\u201d\r\n\r\nThe municipal building in Stirling not only provided the setting for the police station, incorporating Drummond and Bruce\u2019s showdown, but also for the scenes with Bruce and Bladesey at their Masonic Lodge. It also housed some of the fantasy sequences; the hilarious Usual Suspects\u2019 style police line-up, and Drummond\u2019s sexy walk down the row of naked policeman.","post_image":null,"big_image":null,"post_excerpt":"Detective Sergeant Bruce Robertson wants a promotion. He is clearly the best man for the job - the rest of his colleagues are just idiots. Annoyingly, there's been a murder and Bruce's boss wants results. No problem for Bruce. He's in control and when he solves the case and wins the promotion, his wife will return to him. No problem.","post_date":"19th August 2019, 13:47:54","french_date":"19 ao\u00fbt 2019, 13:47:54","post_date_gmt":"2019-08-19 17:47:54","comment_count":"0","author_name":"MoreMovieDetails"}]